Tag Archives: confectioner’s sugar

“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies

“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip CookiesYou know how sometimes you test a cake recipe a few too many times because you’re a perfectionist and then you’ve got approximately one million egg yolks in your fridge with no purpose?

*crickets*“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip CookiesWell, here is something to do with them: “I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies!

*more crickets* + *excitement for cookies*“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip CookiesAnyway…this is a recipe born of necessity. Namely, the necessity to not waste good ingredients. Also, the necessity for something that can be eaten immediately or frozen for later or left on your friends’ front steps for a socially distanced surprise. Trust me, they’ll be beyond thrilled with a bag of these.“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies are, in a word, spectacular. They’re super rich and chewy from three large egg yolks, melted butter, and brown sugar, and incredibly tender thanks to the addition of confectioners sugar. I threw the confectioner’s sugar in the first batch on a whim just to see what would happen and, well, it won’t be the last time. The sweetness, structure and texture it provides are really something—like the cornstarch I put in my other cookies, but better.“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip CookiesThe cookie dough comes together the same way most chocolate chip cookie doughs do—mix together wet and dry ingredients separately, combine them, and fold in some chocolate chips. Give the dough a chill, then roll it into balls and bake until they’re puffed and golden. They’ll get those gorgeous rumples and cracks as they cool–perfect resting spots for granules of coarse salt.

Coarse salt + Chocolate Chip Cookies = best friends forever ❤ “I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip CookiesThese are not only my current favorite way to use up egg yolks, but also my current favorite chocolate chip cookies. They are nice and thick, with crisp exteriors, soft centers, a rich caramel flavor and the perfect amount of chocolate chips. The confectioner’s sugar in the dough gives them an extra-smooth quality and has the added benefit of keeping them soft for days. That’s saying something—I’m a total diva about day-old cookies.“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip CookiesOne more great thing about this recipe is that you can age the dough. I suppose you can age any cookie dough, actually, but I rarely have the fridge space. If you’ve never tried it, aging is as simple as keeping the dough in the fridge for up to a week before rolling and baking. By letting it sit for an extended period, you’re allowing the flavors to deepen in a really wonderful way. The exteriors get a light sheen after baking and the brown sugar flavor really sings. Try it. You’ll like it.“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies

“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies
makes about 2.5 dozen cookies

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
1 cup light or dark brown sugar, packed
3/4 cup confectioners sugar
3 large egg yolks
1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
coarse salt or other finishing salt, for garnish (optional)

In a small-medium mixing bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together butter, brown sugar and confectioner’s sugar until completely combined. Mix in egg yolks, followed by vanilla. Add dry ingredients in two installments, mixing to combine. Use a silicone spatula or wooden spoon to fold in chocolate chips.

Cover dough with plastic wrap and chill for 2 hours or up to a week.

When you’re ready to bake, remove the dough from the refrigerator and let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes, or until hard but still scoopable.

Arrange oven racks in central positions (I do second from top and second from bottom), Preheat oven to 350F. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper.

Scoop dough in 2 tablespoon increments, roll into balls, and place them 3 inches apart on prepared pans. Bake 6 minutes, then rotate the pans top-to-bottom and front-to-back. Bake 5-6 more minutes, until golden and puffed. Sprinkle with coarse salt. Let cool 7-8 minutes on the pans, then use a spatula to remove the cookies to a rack to cool completely. Bring baking sheets back to room temperature before repeating rolling and baking processes with remaining dough.

Cookies will keep well covered at room temperature for 3-4 days.

Baked cookies may be wrapped tightly and frozen for up to 3 months. Thaw before enjoying.“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies“I Got Yolks” Chocolate Chip Cookies

Powdered Doughnuts

Hello there. Sorry for the unexplained absence. I had planned to post this recipe last week, but the protests in the wake of recent murders of Black people by the police made me pause. It seemed tone deaf to post recipes while people were out in the streets not just in my city or my borough, but literally in front of my building, demanding action against injustice. And so, I went silent on here and joined the movement because I had to. I couldn’t not. I attended rallies, donated money, continued examining my own white privilege, and used my social media accounts to amplify Black voices.Black Lives MatterI’ve made a point of keeping this blog apolitical over the years because I didn’t want to offend anyone. I wanted this site to be neutral on everything but quality baked goods. Even after our current president was elected, I kept my mouth shut. But I will not keep quiet about racism.* I won’t. I simply don’t care if it offends you.

*Also intersectional feminism, LGBTQIA rights/marriage, and pretty much any other human rights issue.

I want to make it clear that I heartily believe Black Lives Matter and am doing my best to listen to Black voices, and support BIPOC-owned businesses and anyone doing their part in the fight against injustice. There is no room for hate here–this is only the beginning and there is much to do.

If you are moved to leave a comment denying the existence of white privilege in any way, please don’t. It’s a waste of time and energy, and I’ll probably just delete it. Instead, please educate yourself on the systems in place that allow you to turn a blind eye without personal consequence.Powdered Doughnuts
Powdered DoughnutsSo…what do Powdered Doughnuts have to do with anti-racism? I’m not exactly sure, but they were supposed to be on the blog last week.

These are pure comfort food—the sort of thing my mom served for breakfast the morning after my sister and I had hosted a slumber party. Until I started testing fresh Powdered Doughnuts, I’d only ever had the packaged kind (I almost always go yeast-raised in doughnut shops), but now I’m a convert.Powdered DoughnutsPowdered DoughnutsPowdered DoughnutsPowdered DoughnutsI mean, can you blame me? These crispy-fried sour cream cake doughnuts are great by themselves, but double coated in powdered sugar (confectioner’s sugar), they’re…beyond. So. dang. good.Powdered DoughnutsThe doughnuts themselves are made with the same formula I’ve been using for a few years now. The dough comes together quickly and only needs a 15 minute rest (to let the gluten relax) before cutting and frying. Once they’re nice and golden, they get a dip in powdered sugar and—voila!—they’re ready to eat.Powdered DoughnutsFluffy on the inside and sugar-dusted on the outside, these are pretty irresistible. Sure, Powdered Doughnuts a bit messy, but almost all wonderful things are.Powdered DoughnutsTake a note from my mom and serve these on leisurely weekend mornings, or make a batch to share while you figure out your next step in finding equality for all. This is only the beginning and there is much to do.Powdered Doughnuts

Powdered Doughnuts
makes 15 2 1/2-inch doughnuts

2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 cup (4 oz) full-fat sour cream
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 large eggs, room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
vegetable or canola oil, for frying
3-4 cups confectioner’s sugar, for coating

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, nutmeg, and salt. Set aside.

Combine sour cream and butter in a small bowl. Microwave in 30 second increments, stirring in between, until butter is totally melted. Let mixture cool a few minutes, until warm to the touch but not uncomfortably hot (if it’s too hot, it could scramble the eggs).

In a small mixing bowl, use a whisk to beat eggs. Whisk in sour cream/butter mixture, followed by vanilla. Use a silicone spatula or wooden spoon to fold wet ingredients into dry. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 15 minutes. Dough will be a bit soft.

Line a rimmed sheet pan with parchment.

Liberally flour a surface and rolling pin. Uncover dough and transfer it to the floured surface. Roll it out to 1/2-inch thickness. Use a doughnut cutter (or graduated cookie cutters) to cut doughnuts. Place cut doughnuts on prepared pan. Re-roll dough as needed.

Pour about 2 inches of oil into a large heavy-bottomed pot and heat to 350F. Line a rimmed sheet pan with two layers of paper towels and set a cooling rack over the top.

Once oil reaches frying temperature, slip 2-3 doughnuts into the pot. Fry 1-1.5 minutes per side, until golden and cooked through. Remove to rack. Continue frying in batches of 2-3, letting the oil return to temperature in between.

Once all doughnuts are fried and cool enough to be handled, place confectioner’s sugar in a pie plate or shallow bowl.

Working with a couple of doughnuts at a time, dip them into the confectioners sugar, then flip them with a fork. For more coverage, flip again. Return finished doughnuts to the rack. Let set for a few minutes before serving.

Doughnuts are best the day they are made.Powdered DoughnutsPowdered DoughnutsPowdered Doughnuts