Blueberry Kolaches

Blueberry KolachesIf the warm weather could just get its act together and show up already, that’d be great. I am so tired of wearing a jacket.Blueberry KolachesWinter tends to linger up here. While the sub-freezing days are long gone, I could do without anything under 70 degrees. It seems like every time we get a nice day, the cold creeps back.Blueberry KolachesIt could absolutely be worse, but…I just want some consistency, you know?Blueberry KolachesAnyway, I may not have any control over the weather outside, but it is decidedly spring at the green market and in my kitchen. I’ve got berries on the brain, as evidenced by last week’s Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote and today’s Blueberry Kolaches!Blueberry KolachesBlueberry KolachesBlueberry KolachesBlueberry KolachesI’ve made three batches of these traditional Czech pastries this week and I can’t. get. enough.Blueberry KolachesBlueberry KolachesBlueberry KolachesThey’re a springtime spin on the Grapefruit Kolaches I made earlier this year. While those were good, I made a few adjustments to the recipe—streamlining is the name of the game these days—and think these kolaches are even better.Blueberry KolachesI mean, it’s pretty hard not to love buttery, pillowy soft pastry, cinnamon crumble (posypka), and fresh blueberry filling ❤Blueberry KolachesYep. Tastes like spring.Blueberry Kolaches

Blueberry Kolaches
makes about 16-18 pastries

1/2 cup (1 stick) + 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
1/2 cup whole milk
1/2 cup full-fat sour cream
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast
3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon lemon zest (from 1 medium lemon)
1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
2 large eggs, room temperature

Blueberry Filling:
1 pint (12 ounces) fresh blueberries
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch of Kosher or sea salt
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Posypka (Crumble):
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

The night before you want to eat kolaches, make the dough. Cut 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter into 8 pieces.Combine butter, whole milk, and sour cream in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Melt together, stirring occasionally, until mixture is warm to the touch (about 115F). Pour into a large mixing bowl and stir in sugar. Sprinkle yeast over the top and allow to prove for 5 minutes. Mixture will have just a few small bubbles.

Add 1 cup of the flour, the lemon zest, and salt to the wet ingredients. Fold together. Fold in beaten eggs, followed by 2 1/4 more cups of flour. Dough will be very soft and a bit sticky.

Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead 5 minutes before forming into a ball. Dough will be very soft and sticky—use a bench scraper for easiest kneading. Grease a mixing bowl with oil. Place dough ball in the bowl, being sure to grease it on all sides. Press plastic wrap to the surface of the dough. Refrigerate overnight, about 8-12 hours.

Make the blueberry filling. Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes, or until berries start bursting. Cool for a few minutes. Transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate overnight.

In the morning, line two rimmed baking sheets with parchment. Remove dough from refrigerator and discard plastic wrap. Into two pieces. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough until it’s 1/2-inch thick. Use a 2 1/2-inch round cutter to cut kolaches, rerolling as necessary. Place 2 inches apart on prepared pans.

Melt 2 tablespoons of butter. Brush on the tops of cut kolache dough. Flour the back of a tablespoon and press it into the center of one kolache to make a well. Immediately fill with 1/2 tablespoon (1 1/2 teaspoons) of blueberry filling. Flour the tablespoon again and repeat process with all remaining kolaches on the baking pan. Repeat process with remaining baking sheet.

Loosely cover with plastic wrap (or greased foil) and allow to rise in a warm, draft-free place for 30-45 minutes, or until doubled in size.

Make the posypka (crumble). Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Stir with a fork until crumbly.

Position oven racks near the center. Preheat the oven to 350F.

Remove plastic wrap from one baking sheet of dough. Top each kolache with a big pinch of posypka. Bake kolaches uncovered for 18-20 minutes, rotating pans front to back at the 10 minute mark. They will be barely-golden when they are done. Brush baked kolaches with 1 tablespoon melted butter.

Let kolaches cool slightly on the pans. Serve warm.

Kolaches are best the day they are made, but may be refrigerated for a couple of days. Warm before serving.Blueberry Kolaches

Funfetti Cake Doughnuts

Funfetti Cake DoughnutsThe idea for these Funfetti Cake Doughnuts popped into my head while my parents were in town last week and I was so enthralled by it that I reorganized my baking schedule so I could make them as. soon. as. possible.Funfetti Cake DoughnutsYou’re welcome.Funfetti Cake DoughnutsI mean, are these the happiest doughnuts you’ve ever seen or what?!Funfetti Cake DoughnutsFunfetti Cake DoughnutsFunfetti Cake DoughnutsFunfetti Cake DoughnutsIf you love sprinkles like I do, these doughnuts are for you. They’re loaded with rainbow sprinkles inside and out and full of rich vanilla flavor. And that’s to say nothing of their perfectly crispy edges and fluffy interiors.Funfetti Cake DoughnutsFunfetti Cake DoughnutsFunfetti Cake DoughnutsFunfetti Cake DoughnutsThese doughnuts aren’t just pretty, y’all—they are ridiculously delicious. Like maybe the best cake doughnuts I’ve ever had. I made these twice this week (one batch for testing, one for pictures), and I just can’t get enough. Not only that, but formulating this recipe allowed me to streamline my previous cake doughnuts into a totally manageable, 90 minute, no-mixer operation. It was a total breakthrough.Funfetti Cake Doughnuts

Doughnut breakthroughs are totally a thing.Funfetti Cake DoughnutsNow that I have a go-to recipe, there’s no going back—I have about 17 new cake doughnut ideas floating around in my head right now.Funfetti Cake DoughnutsFunfetti Cake DoughnutsThat’s something to celebrate. Preferably with Funfetti Cake Doughnuts.Funfetti Cake Doughnuts

Funfetti Cake Doughnuts
makes 15 2 1/2-inch doughnuts

2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 cup (4 oz) full-fat sour cream
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 large eggs, room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon imitation butter extract (optional)
1/3 cup rainbow sprinkles (jimmies)
vegetable or canola oil, for frying

Vanilla Dip:
2 cups confectioners sugar
pinch of fine sea salt (optional)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup (8 tablespoons) heavy cream
1 cup rainbow sprinkles (jimmies or nonpareils), for garnish

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, nutmeg, and salt. Set aside.

Combine sour cream and butter in a small bowl. Microwave in 30 second increments, stirring in between, until butter is totally melted. Let mixture cool a few minutes, until warm to the touch but not uncomfortably hot (if it’s too hot, it could scramble the eggs).

In a small mixing bowl, use a whisk to beat eggs. Whisk in sour cream/butter mixture, followed by vanilla and optional imitation butter extract. Use a silicone spatula or wooden spoon to fold wet ingredients into dry. Carefully fold in sprinkles. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 15 minutes. Dough will be a bit soft.

Line a rimmed sheet pan with parchment.

Liberally flour a surface and rolling pin. Uncover dough and transfer it to the floured surface. Roll it out to 1/2-inch thickness. Use a doughnut cutter (or graduated cookie cutters) to cut doughnuts. Place cut doughnuts on prepared pan. Re-roll dough as needed.

Pour about 2 inches of oil into a large heavy-bottomed pot and heat to 350F. Line a rimmed sheet pan with two layers of paper towels and set a cooling rack over the top.

Once oil reaches frying temperature, slip 2-3 doughnuts into the pot. Fry 1-1.5 minutes per side, until golden and cooked through. Remove to rack. Continue frying in batches of 2-3, letting the oil return to temperature in between.

Once all doughnuts are fried and cool enough to be handled, make the vanilla dip. In a small bowl, use a fork to whisk together confectioners sugar, salt, vanilla, and heavy cream. Place sprinkles in a shallow bowl.

Working with one doughnut at a time, dip each doughnut halfway into the vanilla dip and then either dip into sprinkles or scatter them over the top. Return finished doughnuts to the rack. Let set for 20 minutes.

Serve immediately. Doughnuts are best the day they are made.

Funfetti Cake Doughnuts

Glazed Doughnut Twists

Glazed Doughnut TwistsWhen I think about my favorite recipes on this site, Overnight Yeast-Raised Doughnuts are pretty high on the list. Top five, for sure—probably top three. They are the absolute best doughnuts I have ever had in my life. Ever. EVER.Glazed Doughnut TwistsI’ve posted a couple more doughnuts since then (French Crullers and vegan Churros!). They’re all great, but I love the soft, fluffy slight-chewiness of a yeast-raised doughnut the most. What can I say? I love a classic.Glazed Doughnut TwistsIn fact, the only thing I love more than a classic is a classic with a twist. Most of the time that means an unusual flavor or method, but today it’s completely literal—Glazed Doughnut Twists, y’all! These double-size, yeasted, coiled beauties were one of my favorites to get at my childhood doughnut shop, and I am so happy that I can make them at home now 🙂 This recipe starts out just like my original yeast-raised doughnuts. The dough is identical and the method is the same all the way up through the overnight proof in the refrigerator and the punch-down in the morning.Glazed Doughnut Twists Glazed Doughnut TwistsAfter that, things change a little. Roll the dough into a 1/2-inch thick rectangle and slice it into twelve strips.Glazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsWorking with one strip of dough at a time, roll it into a rope, bend it in half, and give it a few twists. I recommend giving it an extra twist or two—the doughnuts will uncoil slightly between now and when they are done.Glazed Doughnut TwistsPlace the twisted doughnuts on pieces of wax paper before putting them on a baking sheet. Let them rise for 30 minutes in a warm, draft-free place.Next up, fry the doughnuts in 360F oil until they’re deep golden…Glazed Doughnut Twists…and then give them a dip in a classic doughnut glaze. The glaze recipe makes more than you’ll need to glaze a dozen doughnuts, but I find it’s always best to have extra when you’re dipping something. It takes the stress out of the whole process.Glazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsI mean, doughnuts aren’t supposed to be stressful. They’re supposed to be delicious.Glazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsY’all, these Glazed Doughnut Twists are beyond fantastic! They’re soft and puffy and flavorful, and the glaze…well, it sort of shatters and melts at the same time. It sounds odd when it’s characterized that way, but it’s divine. These doughnuts are the best of all fried pastry worlds, twisted into one simple, sweet treat.Glazed Doughnut TwistsOne last thing before I get to the recipe. I know making fried doughnuts at home seems too difficult or like it may be too much work, but you are absolutely capable of making these and they are worth every ounce of the (surprisingly minimal) energy they require. I believe in you! Now, go make the best doughnuts of your life!Glazed Doughnut Twists

Glazed Doughnut Twists
makes 1 dozen doughnut twists

2 cups bread flour*
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) instant yeast (I use Fleischmann’s Rapid Rise)
1 cup buttermilk,* room temperature
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
2 large eggs, beaten, room temperature
2 quarts shortening or frying oil (like peanut, safflower, or canola), for frying

Classic Doughnut Glaze:
2 pounds confectioners sugar
1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
3/4 cup hot tap water

The night before:

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together bread flour, all-purpose flour, sugar, nutmeg, salt, and instant yeast. Set aside.

Combine buttermilk and butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Warm until hot to the touch, about 115F. Use a silicone spatula to fold liquid into dry ingredients. Fold in eggs until a sticky, shaggy dough forms. Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead for 6-8 minutes, until dough is smooth. Shape dough into a ball and place in an oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight (8-12 hours).

The day of:

Cut a large sheet of wax paper into 12 8×3-inch rectangles. Place squares on two rimmed baking sheets.

Remove cold dough from the fridge and turn onto a floured surface. Roll into an 9×12-inch rectangle that is about 1/2-inch thick. Use a large, sharp chef’s knife to slice dough horizontally into 12 even strips.

Twist the dough. Working with one strip at a time (and loosely covering the remaining dough), roll the strip into a 13-inch rope. Bend it so that it’s a narrow arch, and then twist together, pinching together loose ends. Place on a rectangle of wax paper and then on the prepared pans. Repeat with remaining dough strips.

Gently lay plastic wrap or a sheet of wax paper over the tops of the pans and allow doughnuts to rise in a warm, draft-free environment* for 30 minutes. Once puffy, remove doughnuts from oven.

Place a cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet, and set in close proximity to the stove. Also place tongs and a frying spider (if using) near the stove.

Heat shortening or oil to 360F. Add a couple of doughnuts (still on their the wax paper) to the hot oil. Almost immediately, use tongs to lift wax paper out of the oil. Discard. Fry doughnuts for 1-2 minutes per side, until golden and cooked through. Remove to rack. Let oil warm back up between batches. Continue with remaining doughnuts.

Make classic doughnut glaze. In a large mixing bowl, whisk all ingredients together until smooth. Pour glaze into a shallow dish. Dip one doughnut at a time, spooning more glaze over the top as you go. Transfer back to rack. Repeat with all remaining doughnuts. Glaze will set after 15-20 minutes.

Doughnuts are best the day they are made. Leftovers will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for about a day.

Notes:
1. If you do not have bread flour, you may substitute an equal volume of all-purpose flour. Your doughnuts will not have as much chew as those made with bread flour, but they will still be delicious.
2. If you do not have buttermilk, you may make a substitute with lemon juice (or vinegar) and milk. Pour 1 tablespoon of vinegar into a liquid measuring cup. Pour in milk until the liquid reaches the 1 cup mark. Let sit for five minutes before proceeding with the recipe as written. Whole and low-fat milks are fine, but I do not recommend skim or nonfat.
3. I preheat my oven to 200F, turn it off, and slide the doughnuts inside. After 30 minutes, they are puffy and ready to fry. Works every time.

Glazed Doughnut Twists

Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal

Carrot Cake Baked OatmealIt feels like I’m jumping the gun by posting a carrot cake-flavored recipe in the middle of March, just after the third nor’easter in twelve days, but Easter is on the early side this year, so I suppose I’m right on time.Carrot Cake Baked OatmealI get that Carrot Cake is popular around Easter because of the whole Easter Bunny/rabbits + carrots thing but, like, is there ever a bad time for carrot cake?!Carrot Cake Baked OatmealI think not. I could eat it any day, anytime, on a boat/plane/train/any other Seussical place without complaint. Except for the whole general health and well-being and needing bigger pants thing. But if those obstacles weren’t standing in my way, let me tell you, it’d be all carrot cake all the time. That and things made with malted milk powder.Carrot Cake Baked OatmealAs it stands though, I just bought a pair of Levi’s 501s that make me feel like a supermodel and I am trying to eat well (outside of the occasional pie, kolaches, and Oreo-stuffed treats—job hazards, you know). So, I made a little compromise and put all the flavors of carrot cake in a delicious and deliciously easy baked oatmeal that works just as well as a make-ahead weekday breakfast as is does as part of an Easter weekend brunch.Carrot Cake Baked OatmealCarrot Cake Baked OatmealThis Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal comes together quickly and easily, and has huge flavor thanks to warming spices, the classic additions of raisins and chopped pecans, and maple syrup.Carrot Cake Baked OatmealIt bakes up in just half an hour. You could certainly serve it on its own, but I like an extra drizzle of maple syrup, just for kicks. A dollop of yogurt couldn’t hurt either.Carrot Cake Baked OatmealAnother great thing about this breakfast? It’s high in protein, so you won’t be starving two hours after you’ve eaten. Oh, and if you use certified gluten-free oats, it’s gluten-free too 🙂 Yep. This is the sort of everyday indulgence I can get behind.Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal

Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal
makes one 9-inch square pan

2/3 cup raisins, optional
1 cup water
2 cups old-fashioned oats (certified gluten-free, if needed)
2/3 cup chopped pecans (or walnuts), optional
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
2 large eggs, room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1/3 cup pure maple syrup
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted
1 1/2 cups milk of choice
1 1/2 cups grated carrots

For serving (optional):
pure maple syrup
plain yogurt

Preheat oven to 375F. Grease a 9-inch square baking dish. Set aside.

Place raisins in a small bowl. Bring water to a boil and pour over raisins. Let sit while you prepare the oatmeal.

When oven is heated. Place oats and chopped pecans on a dry rimmed baking sheet. Let toast in the oven for 5 minutes, or until fragrant. Pour into a medium-large mixing bowl and stir in cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, baking powder, and salt.

In a separate mixing bowl, beat eggs with a whisk. Mix in vanilla, maple syrup, melted butter, and milk. Pour over dry mixture and fold together with a silicone spatula or wooden spoon. Fold in carrots. Drain raisins and mix them into the oatmeal.

Transfer oatmeal to prepared pan and spread into an even layer. Bake uncovered for 30-32 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Let cool for a few minutes before serving with a drizzle of maple syrup and/or a dollop of yogurt, if desired. Oatmeal scoops best initially, but may be sliced after it cools.

Leftover baked oatmeal will keep covered in the refrigerator for up to five days. Reheat individual portions before serving.

Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal

Grapefruit Kolaches

Grapefruit KolachesToday is Texas Independence Day! On March 2, 1836, Texas became independent from Mexico, briefly becoming the Republic of Texas before it became part of the United States in 1845. Growing up in the Lone Star State, I can’t recall ever acknowledging this holiday in any formal way, but when I realized that March 2nd fell on a “blog day,” I set out to bake up a Texan delicacy: kolaches.
Grapefruit KolachesIf you’ve ever driven up or down I-35 between Austin and Dallas-Fort Worth, you know the turn-off for West (the town, not the direction) means two things: a pit-stop and kolaches (“kohl-ah-cheh”). This small Czech enclave is one of the most popular food attractions in Texas. I’m not exactly sure how this came to be the state capitol of Czech pastry, but basically everyone who has ever stopped at the Czech Stop is grateful it exists. Kolaches are the ultimate in Texan road trip snacks.
Grapefruit KolachesFun fact: I happen to be of Czech descent (my mother’s maiden name is Fitzek), but my ancestors came to the U.S. by way of Chicago and didn’t bake, as far as I know. But back to the pastries…
Grapefruit KolachesIf you haven’t had a kolache, just imagine a puffy, pillowy-soft pastry filled with sweet fruit filling (or sweet cheese or savory sausage & jalapeño). Apricot, prune, and poppy seed are some of the most popular traditional flavors, but when I set out to make quality homemade kolaches, I wanted to go extra Texan. I set my focus on a sweet-tart filling made from Texas Ruby Red Grapefruits.
Grapefruit KolachesAs far as I’m concerned, kolaches are a great treat any time of day, but I think they’re especially good alongside a cup of coffee on a weekend morning. But who wants to get up way early and work with yeast dough for three hours on the weekend?!
Grapefruit Kolaches My solution is to make the dough the night before and let it rise in the fridge while I sleep. This cuts waaaaay down on the early morning time commitment. Plus, the dough is initially super soft, thanks to the additions of sour cream, whole milk, and melted butter. It’s much easier to manipulate after a long chill.
Grapefruit KolachesGrapefruit KolachesJust punch it down in the morning…Grapefruit KolachesGrapefruit KolachesGrapefruit Kolaches
…roll it out and cut it into 2 1/2” circles. Brush them with melted butter.
Grapefruit KolachesGrapefruit KolachesLet them rise for half an hour while you mix together the posypka (crumble topping) and add a little flour to the homemade grapefruit curd filling. This will help keep it from running out of the kolaches while baking.
Grapefruit KolachesGrapefruit KolachesOnce 30 minutes are up, press a well into each piece of dough.
Grapefruit KolachesFill them with grapefruit filling…Grapefruit Kolaches
…and top them with the posypka.
Grapefruit KolachesBake the kolaches at 350F for 12-14 minutes, just until they’re barely starting to turn golden and smell like butter and grapefruit and nostalgia for your Texan childhood.

That last part may just be for me 🙂
Grapefruit KolachesGive the finished kolaches another brush of melted butter before digging in.
Grapefruit KolachesWhether or not you are familiar with these Czech pastries, you are in for a treat! Grapefruit Kolaches are super soft and buttery and the grapefruit filling has the perfect sweet-tart balance. One (or two) paired with a cup of coffee can make almost anyone happy to be awake.
Grapefruit KolachesAs if there were any doubt, I’m always happy to be Texan.Grapefruit Kolaches

Grapefruit Kolaches
makes about 22 pastries

1/2 cup (1 stick) + 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
1/2 cup whole milk
1/2 cup full-fat sour cream
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast
3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon lemon zest (from 1 medium lemon)
1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
2 large eggs, room temperature

Filling:
1 cup grapefruit curd (recipe below)
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Posypka (Crumble):
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

The night before you want to eat kolaches, makethe dough. Cut 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter into 8 pieces.Combine butter, whole milk, and sour cream in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Melt together, stirring occasionally, until mixture is warm to the touch (about 115F). Pour into a large mixing bowl and stir in sugar. Sprinkle yeast over the top and allow to prove for 5 minutes. Mixture will have just a few small bubbles.

Add 1 cup of the flour, the lemon zest, and salt to the wet ingredients. Fold together. Fold in beaten eggs, followed by 2 1/4 more cups of flour. Dough will be very soft and a bit sticky.

Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead 5 minutes before forming into a ball. Dough may be challenging to manipulate—use a bench scraper for easiest kneading. Grease a mixing bowl with oil. Place dough ball in the bowl, being sure to grease it on all sides. Press plastic wrap to the surface of the dough. Refrigerate overnight, about 8-12 hours.

In the morning, line two rimmed baking sheets with parchment. Remove dough from refrigerator and discard plastic wrap. Into two pieces. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough until it’s 1/2-inch thick. Use a 2 1/2-inch round cutter to cut kolaches, rerolling as necessary. Place 3 inches apart on prepared pans.

Melt 2 tablespoons of butter. Brush on the tops of cut kolache dough. Loosely cover with plastic wrap (or greased foil) and allow to rise in a warm, draft-free place for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the filling. In a small bowl, use a fork to stir together grapefruit curd and flour until combined. Cover and refrigerate until needed.

Make the posypka (crumble). Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Stir with a fork until crumbly.

Position oven racks near the center. Preheat the oven to 350F.

Remove plastic wrap from one baking sheet of dough. Flour the back of a tablespoon and press it into the center of one kolache to make a well. Immediately fill with 1/2 tablespoon (1 1/2 teaspoons) of grapefruit filling. Flour the tablespoon again and repeat process with all remaining kolaches on the baking pan. Top all kolaches with a big pinch of the posypka. Repeat process with remaining baking sheet.

Bake kolaches uncovered for 12-14 minutes, rotating pans front to back at the 6 Minute mark. They will be barely-golden when they are done. Brush bakes kolaches with 1 tablespoon melted butter.

Let kolaches cool slightly on the pans. Serve warm.

Kolaches are best the day they are made, but may be refrigerated for a couple of days. Warm before serving.

Grapefruit Curd
makes about 1 1/3 cups

1 1/2 cups fresh-squeezed ruby red grapefruit juice, from about 2 large grapefruits
2 tablespoons grapefruit zest, from about 2 large grapefruits
1/2 cup granulated sugar
pinch of salt
1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice, from about 1/2 medium lemon
1 large egg + 3 large egg yolks, room temperature
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature, cut into 24 small cubes

Pour grapefruit juice in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and cook until reduced to 2/3 cup (about 12-15 minutes). Remove from heat and cool 5 minutes.

Fill a small pot with 1-2 inches of water. Set a heatproof bowl over the top, ensuring that the water does not touch the bottom of the bowl. Remove bowl and bring water to a simmer.

In the heatproof bowl, whisk together grapefruit zest, sugar, warm grapefruit reduction, lemon juice, and eggs. Set bowl over the pot of simmering water. Whisk constantly until mixture thickens slightly (it should coat the back of a spoon). Add butter 1-2 cubes at a time, whisking until melted. Continue until all butter is used. This should take 11-15 minutes total.

Set a fine mesh sieve over a medium mixing bowl. Push curd through sieve to remove zest. Transfer curd to a jar (or other container) and press a piece of plastic wrap to the top. Chill well.

Grapefruit KolachesGrapefruit Curd