Tag Archives: donuts

Cinnamon Roll Doughnuts

Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsA few weeks ago, there was a Facebook poll going around asking if a cinnamon roll is a doughnut. I don’t know where or why it started, but I compulsively swiped it every time it came up on my feed just to make sure everyone I know understands that cinnamon rolls are not doughnuts.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Rolls = baked pastry.

Doughnuts = fried* pastry.

*Baked Doughnuts = muffins in disguise.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsOf course, there are exceptions to every rule and, oh, do I love finding an exception. Today’s recipe, Cinnamon Roll Doughnuts, are exactly what they sound like: fluffy, brown sugary cinnamon rolls made from doughnut dough, fried ‘til golden and dunked in a classic sugar glaze. They are both cinnamon roll and a doughnut and they are exactly as delicious as they sound.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsThe inspiration for these comes from my childhood doughnut shop, Dale’s Donuts #9.* They made (and I assume that they still make) a version of these, and since I didn’t grow up with much home baking, I just assumed that all cinnamon rolls were doughnuts. As has been established, they are not, but I didn’t know at the time and I don’t think I would have cared…unless there wasn’t one left for me after a Sunday doughnut run.

*I have never encountered Dale’s Donuts #1-#8. If you ever do, please tell me. I would love to know they exist.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsAnyway…I’ve since learned to make great cinnamon rolls and doughnuts, but the cinnamon roll doughnuts of my youth have eluded me. I’ve looked for something comparable in every doughnut shop I’ve encountered over the years (which has been a lot), but have come up empty-handed…so I figured it out myself.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Roll Doughnuts are as simple to make as any of my other yeasted doughnuts. They begin like many sweet rolls and doughnuts do: by making a dough and letting it rise slowly in the refrigerator overnight. This makes for prime gluten development (critical for softness and chew) and nuanced flavor, and it means you don’t have to get up at 5am to make doughnuts in time for breakfast.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsThe next day, the dough is punched down, rolled into a rectangle, filled with cinnamon & brown sugar, rolled back up, and sliced.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Roll DoughnutsThen the rolls are then pressed down with the heel of your hand and the ends are secured with toothpicks before a short second rise. These steps will keep them unraveling while rising and frying.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsAnd speaking of frying, this is when these rolls take a decidedly doughnut-esque turn. Each one is fried in hot oil until golden and fully cooked in the middle. Some filling will escape during frying—that’s the nature of the beast—but trust me when I say your doughnuts will still be plenty cinnamony.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Roll DoughnutsOnce they’re all fried and golden, the Cinnamon Roll Doughnuts get a dip in a sugar glaze. You could spread them with cream cheese frosting instead, but I really love the contrast of soft doughnut, buttery cinnamon filling and shattering sugar glaze.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsIt tastes like childhood and doughnut victory and a very delicious exception to the rules. The best.Cinnamon Roll Doughnuts

Cinnamon Roll Doughnuts
makes 16 doughnuts

Doughnut Dough:
2 cups bread flour*
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) instant yeast (I used Red Star Platinum)
1 cup buttermilk,* room temperature
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
2 large eggs, beaten, room temperature
2 quarts shortening or frying oil (like peanut, safflower, or canola), for frying

Filling:
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1/2 cup light or dark brown sugar, packed
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

Glaze:
2 pounds confectioners sugar
1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
3/4 cup hot tap water

For Assembly:
parchment
wooden toothpicks

Make the dough the night before. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together bread flour, all-purpose flour, sugar, nutmeg, salt, and instant yeast. Set aside.

Combine buttermilk and butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Warm until hot to the touch, about 115F. Use a silicone spatula to fold liquid into dry ingredients. Fold in eggs until a sticky, shaggy dough forms. Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead for 6-8 minutes, until dough is smooth. Shape dough into a ball and place in an oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

The next morning, cut a large sheet of parchment into 16 4-inch squares. Place squares on two rimmed baking sheets. Place a separate whole sheet on a third pan.

Fill the dough and form the rolls. Remove plastic wrap from dough and punch down. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a 14×17-inch rectangle. Use a pastry brush to apply butter to the surface of the dough. Combine brown sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and whisk to combine. Sprinkle over the surface of the dough, leaving a 1/2-inch border on all sides.

Starting with the long edge furthest from your body, tightly roll filled dough toward you, smoothing any seams with your thumbs. Slice dough into 16 rolls. Place each on a square of parchment.

Flour the heel of your hand and press each roll down so that it’s flat and squat. Use toothpicks to secure the end of each roll and use another toothpick to secure the other side of the roll. Do not skip these steps.

Gently lay plastic wrap or a sheet of wax paper over the tops of the pans and allow doughnuts to rise in a warm, draft-free environment* for 45 minutes. Once puffy, remove doughnuts from oven.

Place a cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet, and set in close proximity to the stove.

Heat shortening or oil to 375F. Working in small batches, fry doughnuts 1.5-2 minutes per side, until deeply golden. Remove to rack. Continue with remaining doughnuts.

Make classic doughnut glaze. In a large mixing bowl, whisk all ingredients together until smooth. Pour glaze into a shallow dish. Dip one doughnut at a time before transferring back to rack. Repeat with all remaining doughnuts. Glaze will set after 15-20 minutes.

Doughnuts are best the day they are made. Leftovers will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for about a day.

Dipped doughnuts are best the day they are made.

Notes:

1. If you do not have bread flour, you may substitute an equal volume of all-purpose flour. Your doughnuts will not have as much chew as those made with bread flour, but they will still be delicious.
2. If you do not have buttermilk, you may make a substitute with lemon juice (or vinegar) and milk. Pour 1 tablespoon of vinegar into a liquid measuring cup. Pour in milk until the liquid reaches the 1 cup mark. Let sit for five minutes before proceeding with the recipe as written. Whole and low-fat milks are fine, but I do not recommend skim or nonfat.Cinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Roll DoughnutsCinnamon Roll Doughnuts

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Friday Favorites: Doughnuts

It’s National Doughnut Day! If you’ve been around here a while, you know I love doughnuts, especially the homemade variety. You won’t find any baked doughnuts in my archives because when I want a doughnut, I want it to be fried until golden and dipped in a drippy glaze. Baked doughnuts are just muffins in disguise, am I right?!

If you’re intimidated by the idea of frying doughnuts at home, know that there’s nothing to fear! As with all the recipes on this site, if you read carefully and work one step at a time, you’ll be rewarded with doughnuts that rival anything you can get at your local shop!

These are some of my favorite doughnut recipes on this site 🙂 Look out for a new one coming your way next week!

Friday Favorites: Doughnuts

Overnight Yeast-Raised Doughnuts

The secret to my favorite yeast-raised doughnuts—if there is one—is that the dough is made twelve or so hours before it’s time to make the doughnuts. This allows for good gluten formation and leads to a more flavorful final product. An overnight rise also means that you can have fresh doughnuts earlier rather than later. These doughnuts are soft with slightly crispy edges, and the chocolate dip and sprinkles make them totally Insta-worthy 🍩🍩🍩

Friday Favorites: Doughnuts

Glazed Doughnut Twists

Twists were one of my favorites growing up! They’re made with my Overnight Yeast-Raised Doughnut dough, but instead of being punched into rings, it’s sliced into strips and twisted up before frying. The doughnuts are finished off with a dip in a classic sugar glaze that shatters when you bite in—a perfect contrast to their fluffy interiors.

Friday Favorites: Doughnuts

Blueberry Doughnuts

These are my take on a doughnut shop staple, but they’re made with real blueberries instead of whatever sketchy goop commercial Blueberry Doughnuts are studded with. These cake doughnuts are raised with baking powder and come together very quickly in comparison to their yeast-raised counterparts. That means you can have fresh doughnuts in less than a couple of hours! Oh, and you can have these anytime of year because they work best with frozen blueberries! Thank me in February 🙂

Friday Favorites: Doughnuts

Funfetti Cake Doughnuts

Funfetti Cake Doughnuts are made with the same base recipe as my Blueberry Doughnuts, but the fruit is swapped for sprinkles inside and out 😍

Friday Favorites: Doughnuts

French Crullers

French Crullers are neither yeast-raised nor cake doughnuts—in fact, they’re made completely without leaveners! Instead, they’re made with pate a choux (pronounced “pat a shoe,” the same dough used for cream puffs) which relies on eggs and trapped steam to create airy centers. The classic French dough may sound scary (or maybe it’s the ridgy piped rings), but as with all the recipes on this list, this Cruller recipe is simpler than it looks!Friday Favorites: DoughnutsHave you made these or any of my other doughnuts? Let me know in the comments or on social media!

Glazed Doughnut Twists

Glazed Doughnut TwistsWhen I think about my favorite recipes on this site, Overnight Yeast-Raised Doughnuts are pretty high on the list. Top five, for sure—probably top three. They are the absolute best doughnuts I have ever had in my life. Ever. EVER.Glazed Doughnut TwistsI’ve posted a couple more doughnuts since then (French Crullers and vegan Churros!). They’re all great, but I love the soft, fluffy slight-chewiness of a yeast-raised doughnut the most. What can I say? I love a classic.Glazed Doughnut TwistsIn fact, the only thing I love more than a classic is a classic with a twist. Most of the time that means an unusual flavor or method, but today it’s completely literal—Glazed Doughnut Twists, y’all! These double-size, yeasted, coiled beauties were one of my favorites to get at my childhood doughnut shop, and I am so happy that I can make them at home now 🙂 This recipe starts out just like my original yeast-raised doughnuts. The dough is identical and the method is the same all the way up through the overnight proof in the refrigerator and the punch-down in the morning.Glazed Doughnut Twists Glazed Doughnut TwistsAfter that, things change a little. Roll the dough into a 1/2-inch thick rectangle and slice it into twelve strips.Glazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsWorking with one strip of dough at a time, roll it into a rope, bend it in half, and give it a few twists. I recommend giving it an extra twist or two—the doughnuts will uncoil slightly between now and when they are done.Glazed Doughnut TwistsPlace the twisted doughnuts on pieces of wax paper before putting them on a baking sheet. Let them rise for 30 minutes in a warm, draft-free place.Next up, fry the doughnuts in 360F oil until they’re deep golden…Glazed Doughnut Twists…and then give them a dip in a classic doughnut glaze. The glaze recipe makes more than you’ll need to glaze a dozen doughnuts, but I find it’s always best to have extra when you’re dipping something. It takes the stress out of the whole process.Glazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsI mean, doughnuts aren’t supposed to be stressful. They’re supposed to be delicious.Glazed Doughnut TwistsGlazed Doughnut TwistsY’all, these Glazed Doughnut Twists are beyond fantastic! They’re soft and puffy and flavorful, and the glaze…well, it sort of shatters and melts at the same time. It sounds odd when it’s characterized that way, but it’s divine. These doughnuts are the best of all fried pastry worlds, twisted into one simple, sweet treat.Glazed Doughnut TwistsOne last thing before I get to the recipe. I know making fried doughnuts at home seems too difficult or like it may be too much work, but you are absolutely capable of making these and they are worth every ounce of the (surprisingly minimal) energy they require. I believe in you! Now, go make the best doughnuts of your life!Glazed Doughnut Twists

Glazed Doughnut Twists
makes 1 dozen doughnut twists

2 cups bread flour*
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) instant yeast (I use Fleischmann’s Rapid Rise)
1 cup buttermilk,* room temperature
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
2 large eggs, beaten, room temperature
2 quarts shortening or frying oil (like peanut, safflower, or canola), for frying

Classic Doughnut Glaze:
2 pounds confectioners sugar
1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon light corn syrup
3/4 cup hot tap water

The night before:

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together bread flour, all-purpose flour, sugar, nutmeg, salt, and instant yeast. Set aside.

Combine buttermilk and butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Warm until hot to the touch, about 115F. Use a silicone spatula to fold liquid into dry ingredients. Fold in eggs until a sticky, shaggy dough forms. Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead for 6-8 minutes, until dough is smooth. Shape dough into a ball and place in an oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight (8-12 hours).

The day of:

Cut a large sheet of wax paper into 12 8×3-inch rectangles. Place squares on two rimmed baking sheets.

Remove cold dough from the fridge and turn onto a floured surface. Roll into an 9×12-inch rectangle that is about 1/2-inch thick. Use a large, sharp chef’s knife to slice dough horizontally into 12 even strips.

Twist the dough. Working with one strip at a time (and loosely covering the remaining dough), roll the strip into a 13-inch rope. Bend it so that it’s a narrow arch, and then twist together, pinching together loose ends. Place on a rectangle of wax paper and then on the prepared pans. Repeat with remaining dough strips.

Gently lay plastic wrap or a sheet of wax paper over the tops of the pans and allow doughnuts to rise in a warm, draft-free environment* for 30 minutes. Once puffy, remove doughnuts from oven.

Place a cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet, and set in close proximity to the stove. Also place tongs and a frying spider (if using) near the stove.

Heat shortening or oil to 360F. Add a couple of doughnuts (still on their the wax paper) to the hot oil. Almost immediately, use tongs to lift wax paper out of the oil. Discard. Fry doughnuts for 1-2 minutes per side, until golden and cooked through. Remove to rack. Let oil warm back up between batches. Continue with remaining doughnuts.

Make classic doughnut glaze. In a large mixing bowl, whisk all ingredients together until smooth. Pour glaze into a shallow dish. Dip one doughnut at a time, spooning more glaze over the top as you go. Transfer back to rack. Repeat with all remaining doughnuts. Glaze will set after 15-20 minutes.

Doughnuts are best the day they are made. Leftovers will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for about a day.

Notes:
1. If you do not have bread flour, you may substitute an equal volume of all-purpose flour. Your doughnuts will not have as much chew as those made with bread flour, but they will still be delicious.
2. If you do not have buttermilk, you may make a substitute with lemon juice (or vinegar) and milk. Pour 1 tablespoon of vinegar into a liquid measuring cup. Pour in milk until the liquid reaches the 1 cup mark. Let sit for five minutes before proceeding with the recipe as written. Whole and low-fat milks are fine, but I do not recommend skim or nonfat.
3. I preheat my oven to 200F, turn it off, and slide the doughnuts inside. After 30 minutes, they are puffy and ready to fry. Works every time.

Glazed Doughnut Twists