Tag Archives: oatmeal waffles

Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles {Gluten-Free}

Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles {Gluten-Free}​

Since first messing with waffle iron a couple of summers ago, I’ve become a bit obsessed with making a perfect waffle. I logically know there’s no such thing—in art and food and the art of food, everything is subjective—but I keep trying.

My cornmeal waffles are pretty good and so are my mix-and-go vegan oatmeal waffles, but my Sour Cream Waffles are outstanding. They’re my favorites of the bunch—super easy, with no whipping of egg whites and perfect ratios of crispness and fluff every time. I am really proud of that recipe and honestly didn’t think I could do better, until I started fiddling with these Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles a year ago. I began with Marion Cunningham’s Yeast-Raised Waffles one day, and then somehow a bag of oats got involved, and many Saturday morning breakfasts later, here we are. These are my new gold standard.

Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles {Gluten-Free}​

Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles are fluffy inside, crispy outside, and have a surprisingly complex, borderline-savory flavor profile on their own (but pair incredibly well with maple syrup). They don’t really taste whole grain, which is shocking as oats are the primary ingredient. Oh, and if you use gluten-free rolled oats, they’re naturally gluten-free, too. No unusual flours required—just a blender and some time.

If you’re scratching your head at the “yeasted” part of this recipe, wondering why you’d ever put yeast in waffles when baking powder and baking soda seem to do just fine…well, that’s fair. But the thing is, the yeast doesn’t just do lifting here; it adds flavor, too. By blending the batter up the night before and then letting it rise in the refrigerator, you’re allowing that yeast to start fermenting, and that results in deep, rich, slightly sour, nearly-savory flavor that simply can’t happen with a regular mix-and-go waffle recipe. It’s divine.

After a chilly night’s rest, the batter will have puffed and firmed up a bit in the fridge, just like any other yeast-based overnight recipe. You should know that it won’t look particularly nice, but that’s okay because we’re not after beautiful batter—we’re here for gorgeous waffles! When your iron is hot, whisk some eggs, water and baking soda into the chilled batter, and then get waffling.

Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles {Gluten-Free}​

This part, you know how to do. Pour the batter in, close the iron, and let it do its thing until the steam dissipates. Don’t let any built-in green lights tell you what to do; the lack of steam will be your signal that your waffles are perfectly crisp outside and light inside!

Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles {Gluten-Free}​

The recipe is written to make enough waffles for 4-6 people, but…like…good luck sharing them. This is a recipe to double and freeze for a rainy day, when you just need a good waffle. Because these, y’all? They’re good waffles. Easy, whole grain, gluten-free, crispy, fluffy and oh-so-delicious—I’m going to go ahead and say it: they’re my new gold standard. And they just might be yours, too.

Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles {Gluten-Free}​
Yeasted Oatmeal Waffles
about 24 4-inch waffles

The night before:
1 1/4 cups warm water
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
2 1/4 teaspoons (1 packet) active dry yeast
2 2/3 cups old-fashioned oats (certified gluten-free for gluten-free)
1/4 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 1/2 cups milk of choice (I used whole)
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted

The next morning:
1 1/4 teaspoons baking soda
2 large eggs, room temperature
1/3 cup lukewarm water
melted butter or cooking spray, for waffle iron

For serving:
pure maple syrup
butter
fresh seasonal fruit

Special Equipment:
high-powered blender
waffle iron

The night before, proof the yeast. In a small bowl, stir together warm water and sugar until sugar has dissolved. Sprinkle yeast over the top and let sit until bubbly, 5-10 minutes. If your yeast doesn’t foam or bubble, it’s dead. Get new yeast and start again.

Add yeast mixture to a blender, followed by oats, salt, milk and melted butter. Blend until smooth, scraping down the sides as needed. This takes my blender about 2 minutes.

Pour mixture into a medium mixing bowl. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight, a minimum of 8 and up to 24 hours. The batter should double in volume, but may collapse slightly when you move the bowl.

The next morning, preheat the waffle iron. Preheat oven to 200F. Place a cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet.

Uncover refrigerated batter. Whisk in baking soda and eggs, followed by water. Batter may have some visible oat bits—this is normal and will not affect texture.

Grease waffle iron with melted butter or cooking spray. Pour 1/4 cup of the waffle batter into each well of the iron and close the top. Let cook until steam dissipates and the waffles are turning golden, about 6-7 minutes.

Transfer cooked waffles to the prepared rack-over-pan and place in the oven to keep warm. Re-grease the waffle iron and cook remaining batter.

Serve waffles with butter, warmed maple syrup, and seasonal fruit, if desired. Enjoy immediately.

Leftovers may be layered with parchment, placed in a freezer bag, and frozen for up to 3 months. Reheat in the toaster.

Oatmeal Waffles

Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}It seems like every July my mind goes to Maine while my body stays in New York and bakes in preparation to join it…in Maine. That’s how it’s been for the last five years, but this isn’t most years. My mind has been in Maine since March 13th, but I didn’t think I’d physically get there this year, considering literally everything.

I think most of you will agree with me when I say that 2020 blows. It blows hard. That said, as of this past weekend, one thing this year from hell has not taken away (yet) is our annual trip up the coast. It won’t be during the summer and there will be face masks and social distancing and many considerations we would never have imagined six months ago, but—2020 permitting—we will head north in 70 days.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}I’m not saying I manifested a Maine trip, but I’m not saying I didn’t (with a lot of VJ’s help and a big check). What I am saying is that when I started testing these gluten-free, vegan Oatmeal Waffles a few weeks ago, I could only daydream about making them on a sunny Swan’s Island morning…someday. Ten test-batches later, I’m looking forward to making them this October, while sipping a hot cup of coffee and doing some leaf-peeping out our kitchen window.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Until then, these Oatmeal Waffles are my current weekend breakfast obsession. They’re fairly quick and easy to make, and have a slightly sweet whole grain flavor—no cardboard here, I promise. These are real, delicious, syrup-in-every-divot, Saturday morning-worthy waffles, just without the gluten, eggs and dairy.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}The batter is made with eight ingredients: gluten-free old-fashioned oats, non-dairy milk, applesauce, touches of oil and sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. It comes together in the blender and, after resting for ten minutes, makes four burnished, crispy-edged, fluffy-centered waffles—enough for two or four people, or eating one now and freezing three for when a craving hits. And oh, it will hit.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}For those who don’t need or want their waffles to be vegan—something I did intentionally so that VJ and my other friends with dietary needs can enjoy them—the change over to traditional eggs and dairy is very simple to make. Swap the non-dairy milk for whole milk, the applesauce for two large eggs, the oil for melted butter, and bump the oats up to 3 cups. If you don’t need your waffles to be gluten-free, you can just use regular old-fashioned oats—simple as that. The rest of the recipe remains the same, including waiting for the steam to dissipate to determine doneness, rather than trusting the manufacturer’s light on your waffle iron. VJ taught me that last piece of advice, and that lady knows. her. waffles.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Again, I’m not saying I manifested a trip to Maine, but if you put intention—in this case, waffles and a dream—out into the world (and write a check and ask VJ to send a series of emails to the powers that be), sometimes good things happen. Like vacation and a freezer-full of Oatmeal Waffles.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}

Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}
makes about 4 large waffles

For waffles:
2 2/3 cups old-fashioned oats (certified gluten-free for gluten-free)
2 cups unsweetened almond milk (or other non-dairy milk)
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
2 tablespoons canola or coconut oil
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt

For waffle iron:
cooking spray

For serving:
butter (vegan or regular)
maple syrup
fresh seasonal fruit

To make this recipe with traditional eggs and dairy, see the post for swaps.

Combine all waffle ingredients in a high-powered blender. Blitz 45-60 seconds, until mostly smooth (there will be some small flecks of oat). Let batter rest at room temperature for 15 minutes while the waffle iron is heating.

Preheat oven to 200F. Place a cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet.

Grease waffle iron with cooking spray. Pour about 3/4 cup of the waffle batter into the center of the iron and close the top. Let cook until steam dissipates and the waffles are crisp and browned, about 8 minutes.

Transfer cooked waffles to the prepared rack-over-pan and place in the oven to keep warm. Re-grease the waffle iron and cook remaining batter.

Serve waffles with butter, maple syrup, and seasonal fruit, if desired. Enjoy immediately.

Leftovers may be layered with parchment, placed in a freezer bag, and frozen for up to 3 months. Reheat in the toaster.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}