Tag Archives: oats

Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}

Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Did you know you can make a Puff Pancake {Dutch Baby} without any flour? And that by swapping in an equal volume of oats, reducing the milk, and getting the eggs extra foamy, you can get just as golden and rumply a result as in every other version you’ve ever had?Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Well, I didn’t. It hadn’t even occurred to me until I made Oatmeal Waffles a few weeks ago. But indeed, just as you can blend whole oats into cookies, graham crackers and linzers, you can swap them for the usual flour in and make one hell of a Dutch Baby.Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Not only is this oven pancake completely whole grain, it’s also naturally gluten-free! If you or a fellow breakfast guest needs to be gluten-free, make sure your oats are certified gluten-free.Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}If you’re wondering if this Oatmeal Puff Pancake is more work than the traditional version, the answer is “no.” Just like its gluten-full counterpart, the batter comes together in under 90 seconds in a blender, then goes directly into a super hot, buttery pan, then into the oven for 18 minutes.Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}The pancake is ready when the edges are golden brown and the center is beginning to take on color. It will also likely (but not always) have a few large bubbles, which will quickly disappear as the puff relaxes into a smoother bowl shape at room temperature.Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Once it’s deflated, fill your Oatmeal Puff Pancake with your favorite seasonal fruit (I went with the last of the plums and blackberries) and drizzle with maple syrup, or go more traditional with lemon and confectioner’s sugar. Then slice into this custard-centered beauty and behold its crisp-chewy edges.Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Like other Dutch Baby recipes, this Oatmeal Puff Pancake can be scaled up or down depending on the size of your pan and how many servings you need. I’ve included times and proportions for four different yields in the recipe notes to make sure that there’s plenty to go around.

Whether you’re a single person or a family of 5-6, this is one heck of a sweet brunch. If you can’t wait for the weekend though, I have it on good authority that it makes a great Wednesday night breakfast for dinner.Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}

Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}
makes one large puff pancake, about 4-6 servings

4 large eggs, room temperature
1 cup old-fashioned oats (use certified gluten-free for gluten-free)
4 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional, but recommended)
1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
2/3 cups milk of choice (I used whole)
4 tablespoons unsalted butter

For serving:
seasonal fruit
maple syrup
lemon wedges/juice
confectioner’s sugar

For smaller pancakes (6, 8 and 10-inch pans), see notes below the recipe for quantities and baking times.

Place a large (12-inch) ovenproof cast iron or stainless steel pan in a cold oven. Preheat oven to 400F.

In the a high-powered blender (or food processor), blend eggs for 30 seconds until frothy. Add oats, sugar, cinnamon, salt, and milk. Blend another 30-45 seconds.

Once oven has reached 400F, remove the hot pan and add butter. Place pan back in the oven for 60-90 seconds, until butter has melted. Remove pan from the oven, and swirl the butter so it coats the pan. Pour in batter. Bake 17-18 minutes, until puffed and golden. Do NOT open the oven door during baking.

Let pancake cool 2-5 minutes before slicing. Serve immediately with toppings of choice.

Notes:

For a 6-inch pan (1 serving):
1 large egg, room temperature
1/4 cup old-fashioned oats
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
pinch of ground cinnamon (optional, but recommended)
pinch of Kosher or sea salt
3 tablespoons milk of choice
1 tablespoon unsalted butter

Bake for 16-17 minutes.

For an 8-inch pan (2 servings):
2 large eggs, room temperature
1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
pinch of ground cinnamon (optional, but recommended)
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup milk of choice
2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Bake for 16-17 minutes.

For a 10-inch pan (3-4 servings):
3 large eggs, room temperature
3/4 cup old-fashioned oats
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional, but recommended)
3/8-1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt (based on preference)
1/2 cup milk of choice
3 tablespoons unsalted butter

Bake for 17-18 minutes.

Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}Oatmeal Puff Pancake {Gluten-Free Dutch Baby}

Oatmeal Creme Pie Bars

Oatmeal Creme Pie BarsJust like clockwork, every August I crave old back-to-school lunchbox favorites. Yes, I know I am a childless adult who is more than a decade away from her last first day of school, but I guess it’s pavlovian. In years past, it’s been peanut butter & jelly and Rice Krispies Treats. This time around, it’s arguably the second* best packaged sandwich cookie out there: Oatmeal Creme Pies.

*Oreos are first, obviously.Oatmeal Creme Pie BarsNow, I already have a recipe for a homemade version of Oatmeal Creme Piestwo actually—but this is a non-traditional school year and I think that warrants a non-traditional recipe. Nothing radical, nothing complicated. We’re talking all the flavor, soft texture and marshmallow magic of Oatmeal Creme Pies, but less than half the work.Oatmeal Creme Pie BarsOatmeal Creme Pie Bars, y’all! These sweet squares are a cross between a thick cookie and a blondie topped with a soft & swoopy marshmallow frosting, and they taste *just* like your favorite school lunchbox treat. Yesssss.Oatmeal Creme Pie BarsThe cookie layer is a streamlined version of my usual Oatmeal Creme Pie dough, made with quick oats (homemade or store bought) and a hint of cinnamon. The only “major” change is the addition of a tiny spoonful of baking powder for a little extra lift. The batter comes together in minutes before being spooned into a pan, then baked until golden at the edges and nearly cakey in the middle, the way all good Oatmeal Creme Pies are.Oatmeal Creme Pie BarsThe marshmallow frosting is a take on my usual Oatmeal Creme Pie filling. It’s super smooth and a bit glossy in the best possible way. In the past, I’ve used shortening in my Oatmeal Creme Pie filling for maximum nostalgia, but swapped it for butter here with good results.

Heads up that this frosting will not “crust” or set in the same way as a traditional American buttercream, but a brief chill helps it to slice cleanly. It should be soft but not runny, and completely irresistible. With both marshmallow fluff and confectioner’s sugar, it will seem too sweet, but keep in mind that the cookie bar base is pretty light on sugar compared to most, so the end result will be pretty balanced. I mean, it’s still dessert, but it’s not cloying.Oatmeal Creme Pie BarsThis batch of Oatmeal Creme Pie Bars came together in a relative flash—less than two hours top to tail, including cooling—meaning you might have time to whip some up soon, regardless of the fact that lunchboxes may not be a part of your life right now, whether it be because school is virtual or because you’re a 35 year old childless adult with a snack cake habit.

That said, I have it on good authority that after-school/afternoon snacks apply at all ages.Oatmeal Creme Pie Bars

Oatmeal Creme Pie Bars
makes one 8- or 9-inch pan, about 16 bars

Bars:
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
2/3 cup dark brown sugar, packed
1 large egg + 1 large egg yolk, room temperature
1 teaspoon real vanilla extract
3/4 cups quick oats*

Marshmallow Frosting:
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
7 ounces marshmallow fluff (about 1 1/2 cups)
1 1/2 cups confectioner’s sugar
1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 teaspoon real vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350F. Grease an 8- or 9-inch square pan. Line with parchment, leaving some overhang on two sides for removal. Grease again. Set aside.

In a small bowl, whisk together flour, cornstarch, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Set aside.

In a medium mixing bowl, use an electric mixer to beat butter until light and fluffy, 60-90 seconds. Beat in brown sugar, followed by egg and yolk and vanilla. Add dry ingredients and mix to combine. Mix in quick oats.

Spoon batter into the pan and spread in an even layer all the way to the edges. Bake 20-22 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let bars cool completely in their pan on a rack.

Make the marshmallow frosting. Cream the marshmallow fluff and shortening with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Beat in confectioner’s sugar and salt. Add in vanilla and mix on high until the frosting is very fluffy.

Spread frosting over the top of the cooled bars. Chill for 30 minutes to set. Frosting will not harden.

Run a thin knife around the edge of the pan, then use the parchment overhang to lift the bars onto a cutting board. Use a large, sharp chef’s knife to slice bars, wiping clean between cuts. Serve.

Leftovers may be kept covered at room temperature for a couple of days, or in the refrigerator for up to a week. Ideally, they should be kept in one layer, but if stacking, place layers of parchment or wax paper between.

Note:

If you don’t have quick oats, you may blitz 1 cup of old-fashioned oats in the food processor until there are no whole oats visible. Steel cut oats will not work in this recipe.

Oatmeal Creme Pie BarsOatmeal Creme Pie BarsOatmeal Creme Pie Bars

Oatmeal Waffles

Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}It seems like every July my mind goes to Maine while my body stays in New York and bakes in preparation to join it…in Maine. That’s how it’s been for the last five years, but this isn’t most years. My mind has been in Maine since March 13th, but I didn’t think I’d physically get there this year, considering literally everything.

I think most of you will agree with me when I say that 2020 blows. It blows hard. That said, as of this past weekend, one thing this year from hell has not taken away (yet) is our annual trip up the coast. It won’t be during the summer and there will be face masks and social distancing and many considerations we would never have imagined six months ago, but—2020 permitting—we will head north in 70 days.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}I’m not saying I manifested a Maine trip, but I’m not saying I didn’t (with a lot of VJ’s help and a big check). What I am saying is that when I started testing these gluten-free, vegan Oatmeal Waffles a few weeks ago, I could only daydream about making them on a sunny Swan’s Island morning…someday. Ten test-batches later, I’m looking forward to making them this October, while sipping a hot cup of coffee and doing some leaf-peeping out our kitchen window.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Until then, these Oatmeal Waffles are my current weekend breakfast obsession. They’re fairly quick and easy to make, and have a slightly sweet whole grain flavor—no cardboard here, I promise. These are real, delicious, syrup-in-every-divot, Saturday morning-worthy waffles, just without the gluten, eggs and dairy.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}The batter is made with eight ingredients: gluten-free old-fashioned oats, non-dairy milk, applesauce, touches of oil and sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. It comes together in the blender and, after resting for ten minutes, makes four burnished, crispy-edged, fluffy-centered waffles—enough for two or four people, or eating one now and freezing three for when a craving hits. And oh, it will hit.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}For those who don’t need or want their waffles to be vegan—something I did intentionally so that VJ and my other friends with dietary needs can enjoy them—the change over to traditional eggs and dairy is very simple to make. Swap the non-dairy milk for whole milk, the applesauce for two large eggs, the oil for melted butter, and bump the oats up to 3 cups. If you don’t need your waffles to be gluten-free, you can just use regular old-fashioned oats—simple as that. The rest of the recipe remains the same, including waiting for the steam to dissipate to determine doneness, rather than trusting the manufacturer’s light on your waffle iron. VJ taught me that last piece of advice, and that lady knows. her. waffles.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Again, I’m not saying I manifested a trip to Maine, but if you put intention—in this case, waffles and a dream—out into the world (and write a check and ask VJ to send a series of emails to the powers that be), sometimes good things happen. Like vacation and a freezer-full of Oatmeal Waffles.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}

Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}
makes about 4 large waffles

For waffles:
2 2/3 cups old-fashioned oats (certified gluten-free for gluten-free)
2 cups unsweetened almond milk (or other non-dairy milk)
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
2 tablespoons canola or coconut oil
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt

For waffle iron:
cooking spray

For serving:
butter (vegan or regular)
maple syrup
fresh seasonal fruit

To make this recipe with traditional eggs and dairy, see the post for swaps.

Combine all waffle ingredients in a high-powered blender. Blitz 45-60 seconds, until mostly smooth (there will be some small flecks of oat). Let batter rest at room temperature for 15 minutes while the waffle iron is heating.

Preheat oven to 200F. Place a cooling rack over a rimmed baking sheet.

Grease waffle iron with cooking spray. Pour about 3/4 cup of the waffle batter into the center of the iron and close the top. Let cook until steam dissipates and the waffles are crisp and browned, about 8 minutes.

Transfer cooked waffles to the prepared rack-over-pan and place in the oven to keep warm. Re-grease the waffle iron and cook remaining batter.

Serve waffles with butter, maple syrup, and seasonal fruit, if desired. Enjoy immediately.

Leftovers may be layered with parchment, placed in a freezer bag, and frozen for up to 3 months. Reheat in the toaster.Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oatmeal Waffles {Vegan & Gluten-Free}

Oatmeal Raisin Blondies

Oatmeal Raisin BlondiesI posted my best-yet Oatmeal Raisin Cookies last fall, but now I have one-upped myself by simplifying them and baking them up in a square pan. Oatmeal Raisin Blondies, y’all!Oatmeal Raisin BlondiesIf you are an Oatmeal Raisin fan, you’ll love these sweet little bars. They’re super chewy thanks to low flour content, a glut of old-fashioned oats, and a high brown sugar-to-dry ingredients ratio. The raisins are plumped in simmering water before mixing for maximum flavor and texture.Oatmeal Raisin BlondiesOatmeal Raisin BlondiesDeep toasty flavor comes courtesy of brown butter and toasted oats. You could, of course, just melt your butter and use your oats straight out of the bag, but spending a few minutes drawing out their nutty richness makes a huge difference in the final outcome. A teaspoon of cinnamon rounds out the batter and makes these blondies pretty irresistible!Oatmeal Raisin BlondiesThese blondies bake up in 25 or so minutes, until the top is puffed and a little glossy. Let them cool until room temperature and then slice into pieces. The tops will crack in the best way and the middles will be dense and…well, they’re *very* good. The perfect low-maintenance sort of thing to make on this quarantine Wednesday.Oatmeal Raisin Blondies

Oatmeal Raisin Blondies
makes one 8- or 9-inch pan, about 16 servings

1 cup old-fashioned oats
2/3 cup raisins
1 cup water
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into 8 pieces
3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons light or dark brown sugar, packed
1 large egg, room temperature
1 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch of Kosher or sea salt

Preheat the oven to 350F. Grease an 8- or 9-inch square pan. Line with parchment, leaving a little excess on two sides for ease of removal. Grease again. Set aside.

Scatter oats on a dry rimmed baking sheet. Toast 5-7 minutes, or until fragrant. Set aside to cool until you can handle them.

Plump the raisins. Put raisins and water in a small saucepan; if water doesn’t cover the raisins, add more until it does. Put over medium-high heat. When it reaches a simmer, remove from heat and set aside to cool.

Brown the butter. Place butter in a light-colored saucepan over medium heat. Let butter melt. Butter will bubble and crackle as the water content evaporates. Swirl the pan frequently for 5-7 minutes, keeping an eye on the color. When the solids are turning brown and the butter is nutty and fragrant, remove the pot from the heat and immediately pour the brown butter into a small-medium mixing bowl.

Add brown sugar to brown butter and whisk to combine. Mix in the egg and vanilla, followed by flour, cinnamon and salt.

Pour raisins and water through a fine mesh sieve to discard water. Fold raisins into batter.

Transfer batter to prepared pan and spread in an even layer all the way to the edges. Bake 25-30 minutes, or until the top is set and a toothpick inserted in the center comes back with only a few moist crumbs (not batter).

Let cool completely in the pan on a rack. Use excess parchment to lift blondies onto a cutting board. Use a large, sharp chef’s knife to slice into 16 pieces. Serve.

Leftovers will keep covered at room temperature for up to four days.Oatmeal Raisin Blondies Oatmeal Raisin BlondiesOatmeal Raisin Blondies

Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}

Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}I can hardly believe that Christmas is one week away. Thanksgiving was so late this year that I don’t feel like I’ve stopped to bask in the glow of Christmas lights at all, and I won’t have time to until I’m in Texas.Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Don’t get me wrong, my apartment is decorated within an inch of fire code and I’ve been to see all the festive things. I’m just not quite in the spirit yet…except when I’m making cookies. Or showing up to places with cookies. Luckily for me, I do a lot of both of those things. Ain’t life grand?Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Today’s cookies, these Oat-Pecan Linzer beauts, are a crisp, nutty, whole grain take on a classic. They’re as delicious as they are visually stunning, and they have the added benefits of being both gluten-free and vegan, so you know the batch will disappear in no time.Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}The Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookie dough is a variation on the Toasted Oat Graham Crackers I made last year, but with more spice and brown sugar, a touch of cornstarch for tenderness, and toasty pecans in place of some of the oats. The dough comes together in the food processor before being rolled out on parchment, chilled briefly, cut and baked.Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}The cut-out cookies are set over a rack and dusted with confectioner’s sugar, while the whole ones are spread with jam. You can glue your linzers together with any jam or spread you like. I used raspberry jam in the cookies with the tree cut-outs and apricot for the stars. Feel free to get creative with key lime or grapefruit curd or even a swipe of pineapple cake filling (but keep in mind that none of those are vegan).Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}These linzers are everything I love in a holiday cookie: sweet, spiced, stunning and shareable. You *know* how much I love a cookie that accommodates multiple dietary needs! And guess what? I’ve got another coming at you Friday. ‘Tis the season.Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}

Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies
makes about 1.5 dozen sandwich cookies

Oat-Pecan Cookies:
2 cups old fashioned oats* (use certified gluten-free for gluten-free cookies)
3/4 cup raw pecan halves
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/4 cup canola oil
4 tablespoons water

For Assembly:
1/3 cup confectioners sugar
1/2 cup jam (I used 1/4 cup each apricot & raspberry)

Special Equipment:
2 1/2 inch cookie cutter
smaller 1-1 1/2 inch cookie cutter(s)

Place oven racks in the top and bottom positions. Preheat oven to 325F.

Spread oats and pecans on a dry rimmed sheet pan. Place in oven and toast for 5-7 minutes, or until fragrant. Let cool for about 10 minutes.

Line two sheet pans with parchment. Set aside.

Transfer oats and pecans into the bowl of a food processor. Process for 1-1.5 minutes, or until there are no recognizable oats. Pulse in cornstarch, light brown sugar, ginger, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt. Add oil and water, and process until large clumps form.

Turn dough onto a large piece of parchment and lightly knead to form a ball. Lightly dust a rolling pin with cornstarch. Roll dough (still on parchment) to 1/8-inch thickness. Freeze sheets of dough (still on parchment) for 10 minutes, or refrigerate for 30.

Dip cookie cutters in cornstarch and shake off excess. Working with one sheet of dough at a time, use large cutter to cut circles. Carefully peel half of them from parchment and place 2 inches apart on prepared pans. Use smaller cutter(s) to cut centers out of remaining circles. Place cut out cookies on prepared pans. Re-roll scraps to use remaining dough.

Bake 10 minutes before rotating the pans top to bottom and front to back. Bake for an additional 10 minutes. Let cookies cool for 5 minutes before removing to a rack to cool completely. Cookies will initially be slightly soft, but will harden as they cool. Repeat rolling and baking with any remaining dough.

Set a cooling rack over a piece of parchment. Once all cookies are baked and cooled, set the cookies with the centers cut out on a prepared rack. Sift confectioners sugar over the tops.

Spread each whole cookie with ~1 teaspoon of jam (amount is based on your preference). Carefully sandwich cookies together. Serve.

Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days, or in the refrigerator for up to a week. Place wax paper between layers for best storage.Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}Oat-Pecan Linzer Cookies {Vegan & Gluten-Free}