Tag Archives: pulled pork

Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle Sauce

Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SauceRemember that Slow-Roasted Pulled Pork I posted a few weeks ago? It’s one of my very favorite weeknight staples.

Have you tried it yet? If not, get on it! You’re in for a treat 🙂 It makes killer sandwiches, of course, and the recipe makes plenty to freeze for later. Quantity is pretty important for a recipe like that—it’s called “slow-roasted” for a reason.Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SauceI like to freeze the leftovers by the pound, which works out to about four loosely-packed cups of pulled pork. That way, I can thaw just a little bit at a time. You know, for more sandwiches. Or salads. Or nachos. Or eating directly out of the refrigerator.Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SauceAll of those are great options (especially that last one), but these Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle Sauce are almost certainly my favorite way to repurpose my leftovers! Succulent pulled pork wrapped in tender corn tortillas, covered in a simple homemade sauce, smothered with monterey jack and baked until bubbly? Sign me up!Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SaucePork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SaucePork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SaucePork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SauceI absolutely love these enchiladas. I made a big batch last weekend, ate them for dinner for four days, and was still sad to see them go! They’re meaty and smoky, cheesy without being greasy or heavy, and since the filling is prepared beforehand, they’re pretty low-maintenance as far as enchiladas go. Did I mention that the sauce can be made ahead, too?Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SaucePork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle Sauce would be great with rice and beans, but I like them paired with a big salad and a few slices of avocado. They’re also the sort of dish that works just as well for a weeknight as they do for a dinner party.Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SauceOn that note, if you’re making these for a dinner party, I would like to be invited, okay? Okay.Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle Sauce

Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle Sauce
makes about 4-6 servings

Smoky Chipotle Sauce:
1 tablespoon canola oil
1/2 small onion, large diced
3-4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
1-4 chipotles in adobo + 2 teaspoons of the sauce
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
2 teaspoons sugar, honey, or maple syrup
1/2-1 teaspoon fine sea salt, divided
1 cup chicken or vegetable stock

For the enchiladas:
canola oil, for frying
12-16 corn tortillas
3 1/2 cups Smoky Chipotle Sauce
1 pound (about 4 cups) pulled pork
1/2 small onion, finely diced
8 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, shredded

Garnish (optional):
sliced scallions
chopped cilantro

Make the Smoky Chipotle Sauce. Heat oil in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add diced onion and crushed garlic cloves and cook, stirring frequently, until onion has softened (about 7-10 minutes). Remove from heat. Add tomatoes, chipotles in adobo + sauce, cumin, oregano, smoked paprika, sugar, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and stock. Use a stick blender to purée until smooth. Alternatively, you may put all the ingredients, including onion and garlic, into a regular blender and purée.

Return pot to medium heat. Simmer, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Taste and adjust the salt as necessary. Sauce may be made up to 2 days in advance and refrigerated.

Make the enchiladas. Heat 1/2 inch of canola oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Using tongs, briefly fry each tortilla for 5 seconds per side before laying on a plate.

Assemble the enchiladas. Preheat oven to 375F. Grease a large casserole (9×13″) with oil. Pour in 1 cup of sauce and spread it to cover the bottom of the pan. Set aside.

Pour 1 cup of the sauce in a shallow bowl or pie plate. Take tortillas one-by-one. Dip in the sauce to get a thin coat on both sides. Fill each tortilla with about 3-4 tablespoons of pulled pork and a sprinkle of diced onion. Roll them tightly before placing them seam-side down in the prepared pan. Once enchiladas are rolled, top with remaining sauce (about 2 cups) and cheese.

Bake 25-30 minutes, or until the cheese is brown at the edges. Let cool 10 minutes before serving. Garnish with sliced scallions and/or chopped cilantro, if desired.Pork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle SaucePork Enchiladas with Smoky Chipotle Sauce

Slow-Roasted Pulled Pork

Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkHappy 2019! I hope you all had a wonderful holiday season and are refreshed and ready to get back to normal. I am dragging my feet about the whole thing, but keep reminding myself that this is only a three day work-week. Thank goodness.

Now, I don’t know about you, but the last couple of months have left me a little sick of sugary baked goods—not enough to quit making them or anything, but I need a little break. This is a yearly pattern so predictable that I’ve organized my blogging calendar around it. January on E2 Bakes means lots of savory dishes, including many weeknight meals. There may be a dessert or two as well, but that remains to be seen.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkThe first recipe of the year is one of my favorites: Slow-Roasted Pulled Pork. I started making it about four years ago and haven’t looked back.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkI realize that you probably already have a pulled pork recipe that you love. Slow cooker pulled pork became ridiculously popular in the 2000s—one quick google search of those four words will yield approximately a gazillion variations on putting a pork shoulder in a slow cooker and letting it cook for 8 hours or so before being shredded/pulled, combined with barbecue sauce, and served on hamburger buns.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkBut, um, unpopular opinion: I don’t like slow cooker pulled pork. I’m sure yours is great (!)—not trying to yuck your yum—it’s just not for me. You see, every slow cooker pulled pork I’ve ever had has been soft, mushy, stringy, too wet, too saucy, bland, or some combination thereof. I have eaten it when it’s been offered because when other people cook for me I eat what they make, but I just don’t like it. I can’t help it. Every time I eat slow cooker pulled pork, I wish it were more moist and less wet (if that makes sense) and had a simpler, pork-ier flavor. Oh, and crispy bits. You simply can’t get crispy bits with a cooking method that doesn’t allow air circulation…but you can in an oven.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkWhen I found Cara Nicoletti’s pulled pork recipe a few years ago, I felt the need to make it immediately and then many times since. It was pretty perfect already, but I’ve made some adjustments over time to suit my own preferences and now…well, I make the pulled pork I want to eat.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkSlow-Roasted Pulled PorkSlow-Roasted Pulled PorkThis stuff is moist and meaty and not at all stringy or watery. It has an unabashedly porky, slightly salty flavor—perfect piled high on a roll with some crunchy vegetables and a drizzle of barbecue sauce (I go for a mustard-based sauce). It freezes like a dream. Oh, and it has plenty of crispy bits.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkSlow-Roasted Pulled PorkMaking pulled pork in your oven is not as easy as just throwing a pork shoulder in there and calling it a day. It takes time and lots of it—this is a weekend project for sure—but only about 60-90 minutes of it requires your immediate attention. Slow-Roasted Pulled Pork is coated in a mixture of Kosher salt, sugar and black pepper before chilling uncovered in the refrigerator for 12-48 hours. This is called a dry brine, and it’s magical: all the flavor of a traditional brine, but without the big vat of liquid taking up space in your fridge.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkAfter the brining time, the pork is rinsed and dried before being roasted at a low temperature for 6-7 hours. I like to throw some apple cider vinegar in the roasting dish—it adds moisture and flavor over the long cook time.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkSlow-Roasted Pulled PorkAfter the slow roast, the heat goes way up to crisp the skin. One short rest later, those cracklings are chopped and mixed with the finished pulled pork. Then it’s time for sandwiches. And picking at the leftovers every time you pass the fridge.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkSeriously, good luck not eating it all.Slow-Roasted Pulled Pork

Slow-Roasted Pulled Pork
adapted from Cara Nicoletti
makes 12-16 servings

1 6-7 pound bone-in, skin-on pork shoulder
1/4 cup Kosher salt
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon freshly cracked black pepper
1 cup apple cider vinegar

For serving:
sliced rolls
barbecue sauce (I use a mustard-based sauce)
pickles, onions, cabbage/slaw

Read recipe completely before beginning. This is a multi-day process, but requires minimal hands-on time.

A day or two before:

Remove pork shoulder from any packaging and place on a large cutting board. Dry with a clean kitchen towel or paper towels.

Use a large, very sharp (the sharper, the better) chef’s knife to slice a crosshatch pattern into the skin side of the shoulder. Do not slice into the meat.

In a small bowl, use a fork to whisk together Kosher salt, granulated sugar, and black pepper. Use your clean hands to apply mixture to the entire surface of the meat. Place in a large pot or roasting dish (I use my dutch oven), skin-side-up.

Place pork shoulder, in its dish, into the refrigerator. Leave uncovered for at least 12 hours or up to 48.

The day you want to eat pulled pork:

Line a large cutting board with a clean kitchen towel or couple of layers of paper towels.

Remove pork shoulder, in its dish, from the refrigerator. Some liquid may have accumulated.

Lift pork out of its dish. Rinse well in cold water—there may still be some specks of black pepper, even after a few minutes. Place pork on prepared cutting board. Dry with a clean kitchen towel or paper towels. Let sit a room temperature for 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 275F. Place pork skin-side-up in a clean, dry oven-safe pot or roasting dish (I wash and reuse my dutch oven). Pour apple cider vinegar into the dish. Roast pork for 6-7 hours, about an hour per pound. The internal temperature (not taken near the bone) should be 180F. Some liquid may have accumulated.

Turn oven heat up to 500F. Let pork cook, rotating every 5 minutes, until crosshatched skin is dark golden and crispy. Remove from oven.

Let pork sit a room temperature for 20-30 minutes before slicing off the skin/cracklings. Give it a rough chop and aside.

Remove meat from the bone, discarding any excess fat. Place meat in a large heatproof mixing bowl and toss with cracklings.

Serve on rolls with barbecue sauce and other toppings, if desired.

Leftover pork may be frozen in freezer bags for up to 3 months. Bone may also be frozen for use in stock or soup.Slow-Roasted Pulled PorkSlow-Roasted Pulled Pork