Tag Archives: Savory

Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread

Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}When I officially wore myself out baking a few weeks ago and took an extended break, I’d like to say I missed the kitchen immediately, but I didn’t. For five days, I didn’t think about baking (or cooking) at all, except when slapping together a grilled cheese or scrambling eggs so that I didn’t have to live on restaurant food for a week.Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}But then, on the sixth day (Friday), I woke up thinking about Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread. I had all the ingredients (hi, I keep a weird bag of jalapeños in my crisper) and I wanted to make it so bad—the way only someone who obsessively bakes gets about a recipe, as though my body might just go into autopilot and start whisking together ingredients without permission from my brain.

Instead, my body and my brain went to see Uncut Gems, and baking stayed on the back burner for another three days.Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}Then Monday came and lo,* there was Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread, and it was good. Still is good. Like really good. It’s got crisp edges and a brown lid, but the center is tender and almost custard-like from the additions of sour cream and eggs. As it’s made with only yellow cornmeal, there’s no way to overmix and make it tough—difficult to overdevelop the gluten when there is none!

*I guess I say “lo” now.Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}As far as spice levels go, I like to live on the edge….but I used three jalapeños with seeds in the first round and sort of regretted it. This one (the second) is still almost too spicy for me, even after discarding half the seeds, but a bevy of shredded sharp cheddar and a few tablespoons of sugar offset all that intensity. If you’re sensitive to heat, maybe forgo seeds altogether, reduce the amount of jalapeño or try my Chorizo Cornbread instead. Or maybe just make 2020 the year you accidentally burned off all your tastebuds with cornbread and lived to tell the tale.

…ten days into this year and I’m already maximum weird, y’all. Oh lord.Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}

Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread
makes one 9-inch pan

1 cup milk (not skim or non-fat), room temperature
1/2 cup full-fat sour cream, room temperature
2 large eggs, room temperature
2 1/4 cups yellow cornmeal
3 tablespoons granulated sugar (optional)
1 tablespoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1/2-3/4 cup minced fresh jalapeños* (2-3 medium), with or without seeds
8 ounces grated sharp cheddar cheese
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1 tablespoon neutral-flavored oil (I like canola)

Preheat oven to 400F. Place a 9-inch cast iron or other heavyish baking dish it in the oven to heat through. (See note* if you do not have that sort of dish.)

Combine milk, sour cream, and eggs in a measuring cup or small/medium bowl. Whisk together with a fork. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Add minced jalapeños and grated cheddar, and toss to coat. Pour in milk mixture and fold together. Fold in butter.

Remove hot pan from oven and add oil. Carefully swirl to coat. Transfer batter to prepared pan. Bake for 30 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean. Let cool 10 minutes before slicing and serving Warm.

Leftover cornbread will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a few days.

Note:

1. Some people prefer minced pickled jalapeño here, which adds a nice acidic flavor and will have less heat.
2. If using a regular 9-inch baking pan (round or square), grease it, line with parchment, and grease again. Do not preheat the empty pan. Skip the oiling step before adding batter to the pan.Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}Cheesy Jalapeño Cornbread {Gluten-Free}

How to Make Eggs 5 Ways

How to Make Eggs 5 WaysAaaaand we’re back! As is my January blogging tradition, this month will be less about dessert and more about savory foods and weeknight meals—the “normal” stuff. One cannot live on holiday cookies alone (but lord knows I’ve tried).

To start us off, something I make all the time: eggs! Nary a week goes by when I don’t slap an egg on something and call it breakfast, lunch or dinner. In addition to being power-lifters in baking, eggs are an inexpensive, versatile, quick-cooking protein. I always have a couple dozen around!

Today, I’m going to walk you through how to make eggs five ways: scrambled, fried, poached, hard-boiled and soft-boiled. Why so many methods? Because I like options! Sometimes I want a delicate poached egg, other times a creamy hard-boiled egg is the ticket. It’s nice to know how to make ‘em both.

I have written all the instructions and proportions based on large eggs, which are what I keep for both baking and eating. If you are using medium or extra-large eggs, you may need to adjust some cook times. I’ve also written each method to reflect using only two eggs (what I usually eat), but the recipes can be multiplied unless stated otherwise.

While I know there are approximately 742 ways to scramble, fry, poach, and hard- and soft-boil eggs, these are the methods that have consistently worked for me. If you have tips or methods that work for you, please let me know in the comments or on social media! Oh, and let me know your favorite thing to throw an egg on! #putaneggonit am I right?How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysScrambled Eggs

What they are
Eggs that have been beaten with cream, salt and pepper, until fully combined, then cooked low-and-slow, until fluffy, but not browned.

What you’ll need
2 large eggs
1 1/2 teaspoons heavy cream
pinch of salt (I use a scant 1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt)
a few grinds of black pepper
1 tablespoon butter, for cooking

How to make them
In a small mixing bowl, combine eggs, heavy cream, salt and pepper. Use a fork to whisk together until combined and even in color.

Heat a small-medium skillet over medium-low heat. Add butter and swirl to melt. It may foam a bit; just wait for any dramatic bubbling to subside.

Pour in eggs. Using a spatula, start at the outer edge of the pan and push the runny egg toward the center of the pan. Repeat this motion, moving your way around the pan over and over until large curds form. I recommend pulling the eggs off the heat when they still look a tiny bit underdone, so as not to overcook them. They will finish cooking off the heat (“carryover cooking”). Serve.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysSunny Side-Up Fried Eggs

What they are
Eggs with yolks and whites still intact that have been quickly fried in oil (or butter, although I don’t care for the appearance of cooked milk solids on my fried eggs). The edges get lacy while the yolks stays runny and golden. They are called sunny side-up because the yolk resembles a bright golden sun.

For those concerned, there is no need to worry about the dreaded uncooked egg whites here—they’re basted with hot oil so that they set before the yolk becomes hard.

What you’ll need
2 large eggs
1 1/2 tablespoons oil (I prefer olive or canola oil)
salt and pepper, for serving

How to make them
Crack eggs into small bowls (one bowl per egg).

Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat, swirling to coat. Add eggs and let cook until whites are no longer transparent, but not set. They will sputter and pop quite a bit.

Use an oven mitt to lift/tilt the pan so that the hot oil collects at the edge of the pan, away from the eggs. Use a heatproof spoon to spoon oil over the eggs repeatedly until whites are set and the yolks are still jiggly. Edges should be turning golden.

Immediately remove eggs to plates and serve. I highly recommend garlic-rubbed toast as an accoutrement.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysPoached Eggs

What they are
Eggs cooked in simmering (read: not boiling) water until the whites are set and the yolks are still runny, or otherwise cooked to your preference. Although it’s optional, I like to add a splash of vinegar to the water to help the whites set.

I do not recommend making more than 3 poached eggs at a time, as they are extremely time-sensitive. Nothing’s worse than chasing one around the pan with a slotted spoon, only to find that it’s over-cooked!

What you’ll need
water
2 large eggs
a splash (~1 teaspoon) white or apple cider vinegar (optional)
salt and pepper, for serving

How to make them
Fill a 4-quart pot 1/2-2/3 full of water and bring to a boil over high heat.

Crack egg(s) into small bowls (one bowl per egg). Line a small plate with paper towels.

Once water reaches a boil, reduce heat to medium or medium-low, so that it’s at a simmer. Add vinegar, if using.

Working quickly with one egg at a time, bring the bowl close to the surface of the water and pour it in. Immediately drag a slotted spoon under the egg to lift it slightly (this keeps it from sticking to the bottom and has the added benefit of helping the white wrap around the yolk in a pleasing way). Quickly repeat this process with remaining egg. Let simmer 3 minutes, until the whites are set but yolks are still runny. For harder cooked eggs, add 15-30 seconds to the cook time.

Use a slotted spoon to lift eggs out of the water and onto the paper towel-lined plate to drain. Remove eggs to serving plates and enjoy immediately.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHard-Boiled Eggs

What they are
Eggs that have been cooked in their shells until both the whites and yolks are just set. No green-ringed yolks here! These can be made ahead and refrigerated in their shells for up to three days, so they’re great for on-the-go breakfasts or snacks, and making deviled eggs and egg salad, of course.

It’s as quick and easy to make twelve hard-boiled eggs as it is to make two. You can make as many as will fit in your pan.

What you’ll need
2-12 large eggs in their shells (based on need and pan space)
cold tap water
ice

How to make them
Place eggs in a single layer on the bottom of a deep pan. Add cold water to cover by about an inch. Place over high heat and bring to a rolling boil for 1 minute. Remove from heat, but let eggs sit in water for 9 minutes.

While eggs are still in the hot water, fill a bowl with cold water and add lots of ice. When the 9 minutes are up, use a spoon to lift eggs out of the hot water and into the ice bath. Let sit about 10 minutes, or until cooled.

To peel an egg, tap each narrow end of the egg shell on a hard surface, and then gently roll it on the surface to encourage cracking all the way around. Use your fingers to pick the shell away. Rinse with cold water, if needed. Enjoy.

Leftover eggs may be kept in their shells in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysSoft-Boiled Eggs

What they are
Eggs that have been cooked in their shells in boiling water until the whites are just set, but the yolks are jammy. These can be made ahead and refrigerated in their shells for up to three days. These are great on toast, in salads or even in soup (think borscht and ramen).

As with hard-boiled eggs, it’s as quick and easy to make twelve soft-boiled eggs as it is to make two. You can make as many as will fit in your pan.

What you’ll need
2-12 large eggs in their shells (based on need and pan space)
water
ice

How to make them
Fill a deep pan 1/3-1/2 way (so that it’s deep enough to cover an egg). Bring to a boil over high heat. Carefully add eggs and boil for 6.5 minutes.

While eggs are boiling, fill a bowl with cold water and add lots of ice. When the 6.5 minutes are up, use a spoon to quickly and carefully move eggs from hot water to ice bath. Let cool 5-10 minutes, or until you can handle them, before removing from ice bath.

To peel an egg, tap each narrow end of the egg shell on a hard surface, and then gently roll it on the surface to encourage cracking all the way around. Use your fingers to pick the shell away. Rinse with cold water, if needed. Enjoy.

Leftover eggs may be kept in their shells in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 Ways

Tomato & Zucchini Confit

Tomato & Zucchini ConfitThis is the last post-vacation recipe, I promise. After today, I will write about things that are not the most perfect little island off the coast of Maine. I will. But first I’m going to tell you about the easiest, fanciest-sounding (thanks, French name!) savory late summer preserve/condiment/what-have-you: Tomato & Zucchini Confit.Tomato & Zucchini ConfitUnlike the other recipes I’ve posted from our trip, this one was not part of the plan. I was sitting on the Swan’s Island Library internet porch on our second-to-last night trying to think up ways to use the last of our produce, when I saw Chanie Apfelbaum* talking about garlic confit in her Instagram Stories. When I got back to the cottage a little later, I proceeded to make confit from some grape tomatoes and zucchini that were languishing in the fridge and toss it with some red lentil pasta. And it was good. So good that we ate it again for lunch the next day. So good that it was the first thing I cooked when I got home to Brooklyn. So good that I’m here writing about it because it’s so good, you should make it.

*I follow a number of Kosher food blogs, as I make many Shabbat dinners and holiday meals throughout the year. Chanie’s is one of the best.Tomato & Zucchini ConfitNow, you’ve almost certainly heard of confit, most likely in association with duck. The word itself comes from the French word confire—literally “to preserve.” A confit is a preserve created by slow-cooking a food in fat or sugar. Today, we’re confit-ing tomatoes, zucchini and garlic in olive oil.Tomato & Zucchini ConfitTomato & Zucchini ConfitTomato & Zucchini ConfitMaking this confit couldn’t be simpler. Start by tipping a pint of grape tomatoes, some diced zucchini and an entire head’s-worth of garlic cloves into a casserole dish. Season them with thyme, red pepper flakes and salt. Stir in 3/4 cup of olive oil and slow-roast until it’s all soft, caramelized, and fragrant. That’s it.Tomato & Zucchini ConfitThe sky’s the limit on applications. Tomato & Zucchini Confit can be stirred into pasta , grains or beans for a quick meal, or used to garnish chicken or fish. For this post, I just spooned it onto some baguette slices that were toasted in olive oil and called it crostini. Really, put this on anything that could use a touch of herby, savory, garlicky tomato & zucchini. (I think you’ll find that that’s most things.)Tomato & Zucchini ConfitI’ve written this recipe so that the oven is at 300F and the confit cooks for about an hour, but you can go even lower and slower (think 250F for 2 or even 3 hours) for greater depth of flavor. I think it’s pretty wonderful as is though.Tomato & Zucchini ConfitTomato & Zucchini Confit is great the day it’s made, but since it’s a preserve, one batch can last a while. Once it has cooled, just pile it into a jar, top it off with olive oil so that none of the tomato, zucchini or garlic is exposed, and store it in the fridge. When you’re ready to serve it, bring the confit back to room temperature. When you’ve had your fill, top the leftovers with more oil and refrigerate the jar again for up to two weeks. If you’re anything like me though, it won’t be around longer than a few days.Tomato & Zucchini Confit

Tomato & Zucchini Confit
makes about 2 cups

1 head garlic
1 dry pint grape tomatoes, whole
1 large zucchini, 1/2-inch dice
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves (or 1 teaspoon dried)
1/2-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
3/4 cup olive oil

Serving suggestions:
toasted baguette
pasta
cooked grains
beans
chicken or fish

Preheat the oven to 300F.

Separate all the cloves on a head of garlic and peel them; I like to do this by smashing each one with the flat side of a large chef’s knife and slipping off the skins with my fingers.

Place peeled garlic, tomatoes and zucchini in a large casserole dish. Scatter thyme, red pepper flakes and salt over the top. Pour in olive oil and carefully stir to combine. Bake uncovered for 60-75 minutes, or until tomatoes and garlic have begun to caramelize and everything is fragrant.

Let confit cool at room temperature before transferring to a jar with a tight-fitting lid. Top with extra olive oil if anything is exposed before storing in the refrigerator. Tomato & Zucchini Confit will keep in the refrigerator for up to a couple of weeks.

Bring to room temperature before serving. Continue to top the jar off with more olive oil before storing.Tomato & Zucchini ConfitTomato & Zucchini ConfitTomato & Zucchini Confit

Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust

Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}If you’re searching for a plant-based summer recipe that is as visually striking as it is delicious, look no further. This Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust combines two of my favorite things—simply-prepared vegetables and soft corn polenta—and elevates them into one magnificent main. Did I mention that it’s naturally gluten-free and vegetarian?*

*I wrote vegan swaps in the recipe, too.Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}While this recipe takes some time to prepare, none of the steps are difficult and the results are more than worth the effort! You can make things easier for yourself by preparing the polenta and forming the crust a day ahead.Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}When you’re ready to bake, spread on some tomato sauce and slice up a bunch of summer produce. If you’re a little fancier than I am and have a mandoline, this would be a great time to use it.Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}Assemble the tart by arranging the sliced vegetables in concentric circles and finishing them off with olive oil and fresh thyme. Cover the whole thing with a parchment round to ensure that everything cooks evenly. And then…Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}…well, let’s just say I’ll pray for you during the thirty minutes between baking and slicing. I promise it’ll be worth the wait. I mean, when are polenta and ratatouille not worth the wait?!Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}I love this tart when it’s fresh, but you should know that it slices particularly well at room temperature and cold, meaning this is a great make-ahead option. The tart pictured here was made on a Monday and reheated by the slice for lunches all week long.Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}It was exactly as wonderful as it looks.Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}

Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust
ratatouille adapted from Deb Perelman
makes 1 9-inch round tart, 4-6 servings

Polenta Crust:
2 cups water
1 cup whole milk (or unflavored, unsweetened plant milk)
1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 cup coarse ground cornmeal
2 tablespoons unsalted butter or olive oil
1/2 teaspoon prepared dijon mustard
few grinds freshly ground black pepper

Ratatouille:
1/4 cup tomato sauce
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 shallot, minced
1/2-1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt (based on your taste), divided
~1/2 small, thin eggplant, 1/8 inch slices
~1/2 medium zucchini, 1/8 inch slices
~1/2 medium yellow squash, 1/8 inch slices
~1/2 long, thin red bell pepper, seeded, 1/8 inch slices
~1 1/2 roma tomatoes, 1/8 inch slices
1 tablespoon olive oil
few grinds freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves

For assembly:
9-inch round piece of parchment paper

For serving (optional):
fresh parsley or other herbs
feta or goat cheese

Grease a 9-inch round springform pan or tart pan with removable bottom. Set aside.

Make polenta. Bring water and milk to a simmer. Keep an eye on it, as milk can boil over dramatically without much notice. Add 1 teaspoon salt. Whisking constantly, add polenta in a thin stream. Reduce heat to medium-low, whisking very frequently for 25-30 minutes, until thick. Remove from heat. Whisk in butter, dijon, and black pepper. Transfer to prepared pan and use a silicone spatula or wooden spoon to spread it to the edges. Let sit for 15 minutes.

Using the back of a wet spoon, press the polenta from the center toward the edges of the pan to create a rustic crust. Set aside. At this point, the crust may be covered and refrigerated for up to 24 hours.

Preheat oven to 375F. Prepare the ratatouille filling. Spread tomato sauce on the bottom of the tart. Scatter minced garlic and shallot over the top, along with 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Starting from the outer edge and working in a concentric circle to the center, arrange sliced eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash, red bell pepper and tomato in an overlapping pattern. Drizzle with olive oil and top with 1/4-1/2 teaspoon salt, black pepper and fresh thyme.

Cut a piece of parchment to fit over the pan, covering all exposed tart. Gently lay it in the pan. Bake tart 45-55 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Remove and discard parchment. Let tart cool at least 30 minutes before slicing. Serve with fresh herbs or cheese, if desired.

Slices will be neatest at room temperature, but tart may be served at any temperature. Leftovers will keep covered in the refrigerator for up to three days.Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}

Ratatouille Tart with Polenta Crust {Gluten-Free, Plant-Based}

Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones

Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion SconesI don’t know how exactly this began, but somewhere along the line, I got it in my mind that there is no combination that says “casual-but-classy spring lunch” quite like a savory scone with a big green salad.

(Yes, these are the sorts of very specific things I spend ample time thinking about.)Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones

I sincerely don’t know where I got this idea or why I believe it, but…like…I’m not wrong. I can absolutely see Ina Garten serving this exact combination (plus a bundt cake) in a room stuffed to the gills with hydrangeas, and receiving zero complaints.* It’s pretty hard not to like a cheesy scone studded with bacon and scallions alongside a crunchy, fresh salad.

*I haven’t watched Ina in years, but there is a very real chance she did this exact thing and I tucked the idea so deep in my mind that I am just now addressing it. That’s probably it. Mystery solved. I know you’re all relieved.Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones

My Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones are perfect for this application. They’re golden-topped, fluffy-centered and nubbly-edged—perfect for pulling apart while they’re still warm. Their flavor is mostly salty and savory, but they get a little sweetness and heat from honey and cayenne, too. Yum.Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion SconesBacon, Cheddar & Scallion SconesBacon, Cheddar & Scallion SconesBacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones

Like all of my scone recipes, these are really easy to make. Once the bacon is crisped, cooled, and crumbled, the scones come together in about 25 minutes. As with pie dough, biscuits, and rough puff, the key to excellent scones is to keep everything cold and to work the dough *just* until it comes together. Overdo it or let ‘em get sticky and you’ll have bacon, cheddar & scallion hockey pucks—probably not the worst things in the world, but not what we’re going for here.Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones

No, we’re going for airy, buttery, light-centered scones with bits of smoky bacon and sharp scallion, and a little funk from the cheese. Yesssss. I like these by their lonesome when they’re still warm, but a swipe of butter never hurt anything.Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones

They’re also very good split and toasted in the days that follow, if you’re the sort of person who likes to have leftover scones around. (I am.)Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones

Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones
makes 8 scones

2/3 cup whole milk + more for brushing, very cold
2 tablespoons honey
1/2 teaspoon prepared dijon mustard
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper (optional)
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 cup crumbled crispy bacon (about 8 slices)
1 cup freshly-grated sharp cheddar cheese (about 4 ounces)
1/4 cup thinly sliced green scallion tops
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, very cold, cut into cubes

Place an oven rack in the center position. Preheat oven to 425F. Line a baking sheet with parchment or a silicone baking mat. Set aside.

Make the scones. Pour 2/3 cup whole milk into a measuring cup. Whisk in honey and mustard. Chill while you prepare the other ingredients.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, optional cayenne, baking powder, and salt. Stir in bacon, cheddar, and scallions. Use a pastry blender to cut in cold butter until the largest pieces are the size of small peas. Stir in milk mixture with a silicone spatula or wooden spoon until a shaggy dough forms.

Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Use your fingertips to shape dough into a 1-inch thick circle. Slice into eight wedges with a large chef’s knife. Remove cut scones to prepared baking sheet. Brush with additional whole milk. Bake scones for 14-15 minutes, rotating the pan back-to -front at the 7 minute mark. Let scones cool on the pan for ten minutes before serving.

Scones are best the day they are made, but will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to three days.Bacon, Cheddar & Scallion SconesBacon, Cheddar & Scallion SconesBacon, Cheddar & Scallion Scones