Category Archives: frozen treats

Homemade Chocolate Shell

Homemade Chocolate ShellHomemade Chocolate Shell has appeared on here a few times over the years, but always as a part of another recipe. I’ve used it to finish an ice cream cake, as a dip for truffles, and just as a drizzle, but we all know chocolate shell shines brightest on a scoop of ice cream. It’s high time that it gets its own post.Homemade Chocolate ShellChocolate shell is both entertainment and dessert. It goes on ice cream (or anything cold) like chocolate syrup and then magically transforms into a hard edible shell right in front of your eyes! It’s no wonder the popular store brand is marketed as Magic Shell.Homemade Chocolate ShellThe “magic” of chocolate shell was a mystery to me for years—how did they do that?! Turns out, mostly with ingredients and preservatives that I’d rather not ingest whenever I get a hankering for a bowl of ice cream with a snappy chocolate topping. Imagine my utter delight when I discovered Homemade Chocolate Shell could be made with just two easy-to-find, vegan ingredients!Homemade Chocolate ShellHomemade Chocolate ShellYes, all you need to make Homemade Chocolate Shell are four ounces of bittersweet chocolate and two tablespoons of coconut oil. Melt them together, stir until smooth, and then drizzle—or let’s be real, pour—it over a scoop (or three) of ice cream. Then watch as the glossy sauce magically turns into a matte shell in a matter of seconds! It works because coconut oil solidifies at 76F, but that’s way less fun than calling it magic.Homemade Chocolate ShellNot only is Homemade Chocolate Shell made of less-terrifying ingredients than the store bought stuff, it’s more delicious, too. You control the quality of ingredients here, and that goes double since there are only two of them. This batch was made with Trader Joe’s Pound Plus Dark Chocolate and refined coconut oil because those are things that I like and keep on hand.

You may wonder, why refined coconut oil? The answer is simple: because it doesn’t taste like coconut. I like my Homemade Chocolate Shell to taste only of chocolate. That said, if you only have extra virgin coconut oil and don’t mind a little coconut flavor in your chocolate shell, it will work just fine.Homemade Chocolate ShellHands down, my second favorite part of eating Homemade Chocolate Shell is thwacking through it with the side of a spoon. There’s nothing quite like that satisfying snap and the shards of cold chocolate that melt in your mouth.

My first favorite part of eating Homemade Chocolate Shell? Actually eating it. Duh.Homemade Chocolate Shell

Homemade Chocolate Shell
makes about 3/4 cup

4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons coconut oil (preferably refined/high heat)

Combine chopped chocolate and coconut oil into a small bowl. Microwave in 15 second increments, stirring in between, until melted. Let cool 8-10 minutes for optimal pouring consistency (so it doesn’t melt off whatever it’s coating). Pour or drizzle over ice cream or use as a dip for other frozen treats.

Leftover chocolate shell will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to a week. Reheat by microwaving in 10 second increments, stirring in between, until pourable.Homemade Chocolate ShellHomemade Chocolate ShellHomemade Chocolate Shell

Easiest Ever Mango Sherbet

Easiest Ever Mango SherbetI saw a two-ingredient sherbet recipe on Pinterest a few weeks ago and it rocked my world. Did you know that sherbet could be made by blending a couple of frozen fresh mangoes with a can of sweetened condensed milk and freezing it? Because I did not. I had no idea! But indeed it can and you should make some immediately, if not sooner.Easiest Ever Mango SherbetSherbet is a frozen dessert made of fruit and dairy. It’s the best parts of ice cream and sorbet (no-dairy) blitzed into one cold, creamy, vibrant treat! Traditionally, you need an ice cream maker for sherbet, but this no-churn method works incredibly well if you (like me) don’t have one.Easiest Ever Mango SherbetYes, this really is as simple as it sounds—two ingredients, no-churn, easy easy easy. And you can make it with any fruit you want! Peaches, cherries, berries, pineapple, whatever. I went for mango because that’s what my little heart desired on the day I made this batch.

If you want to use fresh fruit, you’ll need to freeze it first. I’ve included a painstaking tutorial on how to slice a mango in the recipe, but the general gist is to cut whatever fruit you’re using (berries excepted) in 3/4”-ish pieces and freeze them until they’re…frozen. You can also just use bagged unsweetened frozen fruit (20-24 ounces), but there’s so much great fresh fruit right now that you may as well take advantage. With an ingredient list this short, quality is key. Easiest Ever Mango SherbetEasiest Ever Mango SherbetEasiest Ever Mango SherbetAs far as actually making the sherbet, it’s as simple as blending the frozen mango with a can of sweetened condensed milk. You can eat it immediately, but I prefer to freeze it so that it’s scoopable.Easiest Ever Mango SherbetRegarding flavor, it’s exactly as you’d expect. The mango is super prominent and the sweetened condensed milk gives it a smooth, sweet finish. I was initially concerned that the natural water in the fruit would cause the sherbet to be icy, but sweetened condensed milk continues to be the no-churn MVP, always producing perfect creamy results. And I do mean perfect.Easiest Ever Mango Sherbet

Easiest Ever Mango Sherbet
makes about 1 quart

2 lbs fresh ripe whole mangos* (about 2 large mangos)
1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk

Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment.

Stand one mango, stem end-down, on a cutting board, Use a large, sharp chef’s knife to slice down one side of the long, wide center pit. Slice down the other side of the pit. You should now have 2 halves and the center pit section.

Take one half and lay it flesh-side-up on the cutting board. Carefully (!!!) slice it in 3/4-1-inch intervals lengthwise, being sure not to slice through the skin. Then slice it in 3/4-1-inch intervals widthwise, again not slicing through the skin. Repeat with remaining mango half.

Use a spoon to scoop mango flesh onto the prepared baking sheet. Use your fingers to separate the pieces. Repeat process with remaining mango. Freeze mango on the baking sheet for 3-4 hours, or until frozen.

(Trim skin from pit pieces and eat the fruit off of them as a snack/cook’s treat.)

Combine frozen mango and sweetened condensed milk in a high-powered blender. Blend on high for about 1 minute, or until smooth and thick. Use a silicone spatula to scrape down the sides of the carafe as necessary. You may eat the sherbet mixture immediately, but it will be soft.

For the scoopable texture pictured above, transfer sherbet mixture to a loaf pan or other vessel. Press a sheet of plastic wrap to the top and cover with aluminum foil. Freeze 4-6 hours before scooping and enjoying.

Mango Sherbet will keep covered in the freezer for up to a month.

Note:

You may make this with store-bought frozen mango. Use 20-24 ounces frozen mango chunks, and start the recipe at the paragraphs beginning “combine frozen mango and sweetened condensed milk.”Easiest Ever Mango SherbetEasiest Ever Mango SherbetEasiest Ever Mango Sherbet

Friday Favorites: Ice Cream

If it’s not already scorching hot everyday where you are, it probably will be soon. NYC rarely hits triple digits, but the sun, concrete and humidity can somehow transform relatively mild 85 degree temperatures into a sweaty hellscape nightmare.

This doesn’t keep me from baking in the summer, but it means I try to delve into cooler territory, namely ice cream. Whether you’re looking for an ice cream cake to serve on the Fourth of July or the perfect topping for a homemade sundae any day of the year, I’ve got you covered! Here are a few of my favorites from the archives.Friday Favorites: Ice CreamHot Fudge

There is no ice cream concoction more iconic than the hot fudge sundae. While you can top it with sprinkles or nuts, or skip the cherry if you really want to, quality hot fudge is non-negotiable. For me, that mean homemade. Not too sweet and made with dark chocolate and cocoa, mine is better than anything you’ll find in stores.Friday Favorites: Ice CreamPeanut Butter Caramel Sauce

Want a more non-traditional ice cream topping? Go for this rich Peanut Butter Caramel Sauce. Sticky and buttery in all the best ways, this is guaranteed to become a new favorite.Friday Favorites: Ice CreamButterscotch Sauce

The simplest recipes always require the most testing! The key to this Butterscotch Sauce is to do nothing. Put all the ingredients in a pot, turn on the heat and do nothing. Really. I promise you’ll be rewarded for your lack of effort.Friday Favorites: Ice CreamFresh Strawberry Malts

I love a malted milkshake! Chocolate is my usual preference, but this version made with fresh seasonal strawberries gives it a run for its money.Friday Favorites: Ice CreamNo-Churn Mint Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Ice Cream

This was my first ice cream post and it’s still my favorite. A combination of two of my favorites, mint chocolate chip and chocolate chip cookie dough, it’s smooth and minty with bite-sized pieces of edible mint chocolate chip cookie dough. I’ve made lots of no-churn ice creams since, but this one is still my favorite.Friday Favorites: Ice CreamMint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream Cake

And speaking of mint chocolate chip…sandwich a quart and a half of it between two thin rounds of chocolate cake, then top it with some whipped cream, homemade magic shell and mint baking chips. And then slice it and serve it to all your friends, or keep it all to yourself. Either way.

Have you made these or any of my other ice cream recipes? Let me know in the comments or on social media!

Banana Malts

Banana MaltsRemember three months ago when everyone was making banana bread all the time? And then how we all got tired of that and decided to put our very ripe bananas in the freezer and dismantle white supremacy instead?Banana MaltsBanana MaltsWell, here’s something to do with those frozen bananas. Throw ‘em in a blender with a couple big scoops of vanilla ice cream, a hefty dose of malted milk powder and some milk and blitz until super thick and banana-y and malty and luxurious.Banana MaltsYes, luxurious–what else would you call something this rich and smooth? The creamy banana-vanilla flavor is only deepened by the addition of malted milk powder. So good.

Oh, and when I say these Banana Malts are thick, I mean it. You could probably stand a spoon in one if you really wanted to. I only didn’t do that because I wanted to drink a malt more than I wanted to defy gravity.Banana MaltsBanana MaltsBanana MaltsNow, I know not everyone loves malted milk powder, but I do. This is the third malted milkshake recipe on this site and I have little doubt that there will be more to come, maybe even this summer. But again, I know not everyone is a malted milk powder fan girl like me. Feel free to leave it out, or try my Caramelized Banana Milkshakes!Banana MaltsEither way, don’t forget the whipped cream and cute straws.Banana Malts

Banana Malts
makes 2 small milkshakes

2 large very ripe bananas, frozen
1 1/3 cup vanilla ice cream
1/2 cup malted milk powder
3/4 cup milk (I used whole), or to preference

For garnish:
whipped cream
banana slices

Slice bananas into chunks. Add to a high-powered blender along with vanilla ice cream, malted milk powder and milk. Put on the lid and blend until completely smooth, scraping down the sides of the container as necessary.

Divide between 2 small glasses and garnish with whipped cream and banana slices, if desired. Enjoy immediately.

Banana MaltsBanana MaltsBanana Malts

Mango Granita

Mango GranitaI first came across a granita recipe in the summer of 2009 and thought “That looks easy and delicious. I’m going to make that.” And then ten years passed.

But I did make granita, and it was/is easy and delicious, and now I’m here to tell you to do the same. Maybe skip the ten years of procrastination though.Mango GranitaMango GranitaIf you are wondering what the heck I’m talking about, granita is a semi-frozen Sicilian dessert–basically a classy snow cone. The texture is fluffy and snowy, but instead of being ice flavored with brightly-colored syrup, it’s made from real fruit with very limited added sugar, and you don’t need a special machine to make it.Mango GranitaTo make this Mango Granita, you’ll need:

  • a few pounds of fresh mango. You could probably use thawed frozen if that’s all you can find.
  • lime juice for brightness. Lime and mango are great together.
  • the tiniest amount of sugar to round things out. Yes, ripe mango is already very sweet, but cold temperatures mean that flavor doesn’t always shine through the way it does at room temperature. I like to add two tablespoons of sugar to the entire recipe. That small amount makes a big difference!
  • a pinch of salt for balance. You can leave this out if you want to, but salt is rarely a bad idea.
  • a blender (or food processor), a dish, a fork, and time.

Mango GranitaMango GranitaThe process is simple. Blitz all the ingredients in a blender until smooth, then pour the purée into a large dish and put it in the freezer for an hour.Mango GranitaWhen that time is up, remove the dish from the freezer. Starting at the outer edge, use a fork to drag the frozen purée into the looser center. This will begin the process of making fluffy, snowy ice crystals. At first, you may feel like you’re dragging a fork through soup, but an hour later, it’ll be a different story.Mango GranitaAnd then, thirty more minutes will go by and crystals will really begin to form! The grainy texture is the “gran-” in granita.Mango GranitaYou’ll know it’s ready when it looks like this:Mango GranitaMango GranitaMango GranitaMango Granita is as delicious as it is beautiful—light and refreshing and perfect for these sweltering last few weeks of summer! The texture is somewhere between a snow cone and a sorbet. Where you might think this would be icy, it’s super smooth and surprisingly creamy. This is the sort of dessert that is great for any occasion from watching Netflix in your PJs to a cookout to a dinner party. It’s vegan, nut-free, low calorie and low sugar–a wonderful option for a crowd!Mango GranitaMango GranitaBefore I get to the recipe, here are a few more tips for granita success:

  • use the largest dish you can. The shallower the layer of purée, the faster it will freeze.
  • you can use any fruit you like! I love mango, but peaches, melon or berries would be magnificent here!
  • make granita on a day you’ll be spending a lot of time at home. This recipe is low maintenance, but the ice crystals need to be scraped every hour at first and then every half-hour. Give ‘em one final scrape before serving.
  • for the love of everything, don’t wait ten years to make this. Ideally, you should make Mango Granita as soon as possible. Like tomorrow.

Have a great weekend, y’all!Mango Granita

Mango Granita
makes about a quart

3 large ripe mangoes (about 3 pounds), pits & skin removed, sliced
1/4 cup fresh lime juice (about 2 limes)
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
pinch of Kosher or sea salt

Combine mango, lime juice, sugar and salt in a high-powered blender and blitz until smooth. Pour into a large shallow dish (I used a 9×13-inch casserole). Freeze for 60 minutes.

Remove cold mixture from freezer. Starting at the outer edge, use a fork to scrape/drag the icier edges of the mixture into the center of the dish. Mixture will still be quite loose. Return dish to the freezer for 45-60 minutes before repeating scraping. Continue to scrape every 30 minutes for the next 1-2 hours, or until the texture is fluffy and snow-like.

Freeze until ready to serve. Give one last scrape before serving in small bowls.

Leftover granita will keep in the freezer for about a week. Scrape before serving.Mango GranitaMango GranitaMango Granita