Tag Archives: eggs

How to Make Eggs 5 Ways

How to Make Eggs 5 WaysAaaaand we’re back! As is my January blogging tradition, this month will be less about dessert and more about savory foods and weeknight meals—the “normal” stuff. One cannot live on holiday cookies alone (but lord knows I’ve tried).

To start us off, something I make all the time: eggs! Nary a week goes by when I don’t slap an egg on something and call it breakfast, lunch or dinner. In addition to being power-lifters in baking, eggs are an inexpensive, versatile, quick-cooking protein. I always have a couple dozen around!

Today, I’m going to walk you through how to make eggs five ways: scrambled, fried, poached, hard-boiled and soft-boiled. Why so many methods? Because I like options! Sometimes I want a delicate poached egg, other times a creamy hard-boiled egg is the ticket. It’s nice to know how to make ‘em both.

I have written all the instructions and proportions based on large eggs, which are what I keep for both baking and eating. If you are using medium or extra-large eggs, you may need to adjust some cook times. I’ve also written each method to reflect using only two eggs (what I usually eat), but the recipes can be multiplied unless stated otherwise.

While I know there are approximately 742 ways to scramble, fry, poach, and hard- and soft-boil eggs, these are the methods that have consistently worked for me. If you have tips or methods that work for you, please let me know in the comments or on social media! Oh, and let me know your favorite thing to throw an egg on! #putaneggonit am I right?How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysScrambled Eggs

What they are
Eggs that have been beaten with cream, salt and pepper, until fully combined, then cooked low-and-slow, until fluffy, but not browned.

What you’ll need
2 large eggs
1 1/2 teaspoons heavy cream
pinch of salt (I use a scant 1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt)
a few grinds of black pepper
1 tablespoon butter, for cooking

How to make them
In a small mixing bowl, combine eggs, heavy cream, salt and pepper. Use a fork to whisk together until combined and even in color.

Heat a small-medium skillet over medium-low heat. Add butter and swirl to melt. It may foam a bit; just wait for any dramatic bubbling to subside.

Pour in eggs. Using a spatula, start at the outer edge of the pan and push the runny egg toward the center of the pan. Repeat this motion, moving your way around the pan over and over until large curds form. I recommend pulling the eggs off the heat when they still look a tiny bit underdone, so as not to overcook them. They will finish cooking off the heat (“carryover cooking”). Serve.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysSunny Side-Up Fried Eggs

What they are
Eggs with yolks and whites still intact that have been quickly fried in oil (or butter, although I don’t care for the appearance of cooked milk solids on my fried eggs). The edges get lacy while the yolks stays runny and golden. They are called sunny side-up because the yolk resembles a bright golden sun.

For those concerned, there is no need to worry about the dreaded uncooked egg whites here—they’re basted with hot oil so that they set before the yolk becomes hard.

What you’ll need
2 large eggs
1 1/2 tablespoons oil (I prefer olive or canola oil)
salt and pepper, for serving

How to make them
Crack eggs into small bowls (one bowl per egg).

Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat, swirling to coat. Add eggs and let cook until whites are no longer transparent, but not set. They will sputter and pop quite a bit.

Use an oven mitt to lift/tilt the pan so that the hot oil collects at the edge of the pan, away from the eggs. Use a heatproof spoon to spoon oil over the eggs repeatedly until whites are set and the yolks are still jiggly. Edges should be turning golden.

Immediately remove eggs to plates and serve. I highly recommend garlic-rubbed toast as an accoutrement.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysPoached Eggs

What they are
Eggs cooked in simmering (read: not boiling) water until the whites are set and the yolks are still runny, or otherwise cooked to your preference. Although it’s optional, I like to add a splash of vinegar to the water to help the whites set.

I do not recommend making more than 3 poached eggs at a time, as they are extremely time-sensitive. Nothing’s worse than chasing one around the pan with a slotted spoon, only to find that it’s over-cooked!

What you’ll need
water
2 large eggs
a splash (~1 teaspoon) white or apple cider vinegar (optional)
salt and pepper, for serving

How to make them
Fill a 4-quart pot 1/2-2/3 full of water and bring to a boil over high heat.

Crack egg(s) into small bowls (one bowl per egg). Line a small plate with paper towels.

Once water reaches a boil, reduce heat to medium or medium-low, so that it’s at a simmer. Add vinegar, if using.

Working quickly with one egg at a time, bring the bowl close to the surface of the water and pour it in. Immediately drag a slotted spoon under the egg to lift it slightly (this keeps it from sticking to the bottom and has the added benefit of helping the white wrap around the yolk in a pleasing way). Quickly repeat this process with remaining egg. Let simmer 3 minutes, until the whites are set but yolks are still runny. For harder cooked eggs, add 15-30 seconds to the cook time.

Use a slotted spoon to lift eggs out of the water and onto the paper towel-lined plate to drain. Remove eggs to serving plates and enjoy immediately.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHard-Boiled Eggs

What they are
Eggs that have been cooked in their shells until both the whites and yolks are just set. No green-ringed yolks here! These can be made ahead and refrigerated in their shells for up to three days, so they’re great for on-the-go breakfasts or snacks, and making deviled eggs and egg salad, of course.

It’s as quick and easy to make twelve hard-boiled eggs as it is to make two. You can make as many as will fit in your pan.

What you’ll need
2-12 large eggs in their shells (based on need and pan space)
cold tap water
ice

How to make them
Place eggs in a single layer on the bottom of a deep pan. Add cold water to cover by about an inch. Place over high heat and bring to a rolling boil for 1 minute. Remove from heat, but let eggs sit in water for 9 minutes.

While eggs are still in the hot water, fill a bowl with cold water and add lots of ice. When the 9 minutes are up, use a spoon to lift eggs out of the hot water and into the ice bath. Let sit about 10 minutes, or until cooled.

To peel an egg, tap each narrow end of the egg shell on a hard surface, and then gently roll it on the surface to encourage cracking all the way around. Use your fingers to pick the shell away. Rinse with cold water, if needed. Enjoy.

Leftover eggs may be kept in their shells in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysSoft-Boiled Eggs

What they are
Eggs that have been cooked in their shells in boiling water until the whites are just set, but the yolks are jammy. These can be made ahead and refrigerated in their shells for up to three days. These are great on toast, in salads or even in soup (think borscht and ramen).

As with hard-boiled eggs, it’s as quick and easy to make twelve soft-boiled eggs as it is to make two. You can make as many as will fit in your pan.

What you’ll need
2-12 large eggs in their shells (based on need and pan space)
water
ice

How to make them
Fill a deep pan 1/3-1/2 way (so that it’s deep enough to cover an egg). Bring to a boil over high heat. Carefully add eggs and boil for 6.5 minutes.

While eggs are boiling, fill a bowl with cold water and add lots of ice. When the 6.5 minutes are up, use a spoon to quickly and carefully move eggs from hot water to ice bath. Let cool 5-10 minutes, or until you can handle them, before removing from ice bath.

To peel an egg, tap each narrow end of the egg shell on a hard surface, and then gently roll it on the surface to encourage cracking all the way around. Use your fingers to pick the shell away. Rinse with cold water, if needed. Enjoy.

Leftover eggs may be kept in their shells in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.How to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 WaysHow to Make Eggs 5 Ways