Tag Archives: Mothers’ Day

Mini Mason Jar Cheesecakes

Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesThree years ago, I went home to Texas for three weeks over Christmas. I was there for the holidays and a family wedding a week into the new year, and I had determined that it was easier to spend an extended period in my home state than it was to fly back and forth. My little sister was home for her winter break too, so we had an odd period of time where our childhood living arrangements were real again, except that everyone had a driver’s license and their own bathroom this time.

Our parents were happy to have us home, even though three weeks is a long time to have company. They made sure we were fed and had transport and as much access to their miniature schnauzer as we wanted (which was all of the access), and requested little in return. In fact, the only thing that was asked of me was to teach my mom to make a cheesecake. Her mom, my grandmother, made wonderful cheesecakes, so I liked the idea that my mom would know how to make one too.Mini Mason Jar Cheesecakes

Of course, there was one problem: I had never made a traditional cheesecake. I still haven’t. Sure, I have baked layers and swirls of it into other things and I have even made a couple of vegan cheesecakes, but I have never done the full springform in a water bath thing. I know it’s not technically difficult, but I live in fear that water will seep into my cake no matter how tightly-wrapped it is and that the work and necessary 24-hour chill will be for nothing. Other people are afraid of pie crust. I am afraid of cheesecake.Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesBut! But. I was going to make a cheesecake with my mom, even going so far as to have my older sister give her a Fat Daddio cheesecake pan for Christmas. I was going to do this thing. And then…I didn’t because we found 43 other ways to fill our time and there was the wedding and then it was time to go back to NYC.Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesNow it’s Mother’s Day weekend three years later and I still owe my mom a cheesecake. I remain reticent about attempting a big one (yes, I know it’s silly) and I don’t know when I’ll be with her long enough to carve out the time, so I have made it easy on both of us and made miniature versions that don’t involve a foil-wrapped pan. Happy Mother’s Day, Mom! I made you six cheesecakes.Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesMini Mason Jar CheesecakesThis small-batch recipe makes just enough to fill six 4-ounce mason jars, but you can easily scale it up depending on your needs. The cheesecake itself is remarkably easy to make—it has a total of nine ingredients and two major steps (both of which are easy), and most of the time commitment is spent waiting for things to cool.Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesMini Mason Jar CheesecakesAs for the water bath (“bain-marie”) step that I fear so much, it’s a breeze. Mason jars are water-tight, so my fear of soggy cheesecake foiled-by-foil doesn’t apply here. These mini desserts bake up evenly and beautifully every time!Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesThey are delicious, too: rich, creamy and tangy with a brown sugary graham cracker crust. You can top them with anything you like: strawberry-rhubarb compote, cherry pie filling, whipped cream, peanut butter caramel…anything! I kept it simple by piling on fresh berries. Why create more work for myself when the perfect topping is sitting in the produce department, you know?!Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesAside from being cute, delicious, and portion-controlled, I love that these cheesecakes are portable. Just press a little plastic wrap to their surfaces after chilling, screw on the mason jar lids, and pack them into a cooler for premium picnicking. Pack the topping(s) separately and let everyone customize their own!Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesSo, after 3.5 years of blogging, there is my first “traditional” cheesecake! Maybe I’ll be brave enough for the real deal before Labor Day. Got any leak-proofing tips for me? Leave them in the comments!Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesHappy Mother’s Day to all those celebrating, especially my cute mom ❤Mini Mason Jar Cheesecakes

Mini Mason Jar Cheesecakes
makes 6 small cheesecakes

Crust:
9 graham crackers
1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
pinch of Kosher or sea salt
6 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

Cheesecake Filling:
1 8-ounce brick full-fat cream cheese, room temperature
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 large egg, room temperature
1/4 cup full-fat sour cream, room temperature
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For Garnish:
seasonal berries
strawberry-rhubarb compote
whipped cream
peanut butter caramel sauce

Preheat oven to 325F. Grease 6 4-ounce mason jars.

Make the crust. Place graham crackers in the bowl of a food processor and process until no large pieces remain. Add light brown sugar, melted butter, and salt. Process until the mixture resembles wet sand, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary.

Place 3 tablespoons of the crust mixture into eat prepared mason jar. Press down to form a crust. Place mason jar crusts in a high-rimmed dish. Bake crust for 10 minutes. Cool on a rack while you prepare the filling.

Make cheesecake. In a medium mixing bowl, use an electric mixer to beat cream cheese until fluffy. Mix in sugar, followed by egg, sour cream, and vanilla, until mixture is smooth.

Place 3 tablespoons of the cheesecake mixture in each mason jar. Use the back of a spoon to lightly smooth out the tops, then tap each one on the counter a few times to release any air bubbles. Return jars to the high-rimmed pan, and place the pan on a counter near the oven.

Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Remove from heat. Carefully pour water into the baking pan until it is halfway up the sides of the cheesecakes. Do not get water in the mason jars. Carefully move pan into the oven. Bake 30 minutes until puffed and ever-so-slightly golden.

Carefully remove pan from oven. Use tongs to remove mason jar cheesecakes to a rack. Do not get water in the mason jars.

Let cheesecakes cool completely on a rack. Transfer to the refrigerator for at least 3 hours, or until thoroughly chilled. If not serving immediately, press plastic wrap to the surface. Garnish with berries or other desired topping before serving.

Store leftover cheesecakes in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. To freeze, press plastic wrap to the surfaces of the cheesecakes and screw on mason jar lids. Freeze for up to one month. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight or in a dish of lukewarm water at room temperature for 90 minutes.Mini Mason Jar CheesecakesMini Mason Jar CheesecakesMini Mason Jar Cheesecakes

Chocolate Macaroon Tart

Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}I had no intention of making a third (or fourth?) Easter dessert, but then I discovered macaroon crust on Pinterest and, well, here we are talking about a Chocolate Macaroon Tart.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}So, what’s so special about a macaroon crust? For one, it’s basically a big chewy, crisp-edged coconut macaroon cookie that you can bake and fill with whatever no-bake filling you like.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}There is no “for two.” It’s that simple.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Now, there are many ways to make a macaroon crust. Some have flour, some contain egg whites. I looked at a few options before realizing that it would probably work with just two ingredients: sweetened flaked coconut and sweetened condensed milk.

Oh, and salt. Can’t forget the salt.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}I folded the ingredients together and pressed the mixture into a heavily-greased springform or tart pan.*

*I think the only piece of baking equipment that I don’t have is a tart pan, which is probably why there have not been many tarts on here. Feel free to use whatever you have.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Half an hour later, it was toasty at the edges and light-golden in the center.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}I filled it with chocolate ganache and let it set up in the fridge before slicing.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}(I also gave it a few swipes with the back of a hot spoon for some rustic glossiness and because I am a control freak.)Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Who knew five Ingredients and no grains could make something this irresistible?! Silky chocolate ganache filling + toasty coconut crust 🙌🏻🙌🏻🙌🏻Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}It’s like eating a chocolate-coconut candy bar…but classier because it’s a tart. We all know how much classiness matters when you’re sneaking cold wedges of Chocolate Macaroon Tart out of the fridge after your bedtime. Not that I’ve ever done that. Twice. On the same night.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Happy Easter to those celebrating! Chag sameach to those observing Passover! And if you’re not celebrating/observing anything, have a great weekend anyway.

Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}
makes one 9- or 10-inch tart, about 12 servings

Macaroon Crust:
1 14-ounce package sweetened flaked coconut
2/3 cup sweetened condensed milk
1/4 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt

Ganache Filling:
12 ounces dark chocolate, chopped
1 cup heavy cream

Preheat oven to 350F. Heavily grease a 9- or 10- inch tart pan or springform pan. Line the bottom with parchment and grease again.

Make the crust. Combine sweetened flaked coconut, sweetened condensed milk, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Use a silicone spatula or wooden spoon to fold together until combined. It will be thick.

Transfer mixture to prepared pan. Lightly grease your hands before pressing mixture onto the bottom and up the sides. Bake 25-30 minutes, or until edges are browned and center is turning pale golden. Remove to a rack and cool completely.

Make ganache filling. Place chopped chocolate in a large measuring cup or heatproof mixing bowl. Heat heavy cream in a small saucepan over medium heat until it is steaming and bubbles are forming at the edge.

Pour warm cream over chopped chocolate. Do not stir. Cover bowl with a lid or aluminum foil for 5 minutes. Remove lid/foil. Use a fork to stir until chocolate and cream are combined and smooth. Pour into crust. Tap a few times to release air bubbles. Let tart sit at room temperature until filling is set (a couple of hours), or chill uncovered in the refrigerator. Remove tart from the fridge at least 15-20 minutes before running a thin, flexible knife around the edge and releasing from the pan.

Slice into thin wedges and serve. Leftovers will keep covered in the refrigerator.Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}Chocolate Macaroon Tart {Five Ingredients, Grain-Free}

Key Lime Linzer Cookies

Key Lime Linzer CookiesHi there 👋 I made you some cookies.Key Lime Linzer CookiesI mean, I baked them last week and ate them all already, but you understand, right? Things that taste like Key Lime Pie but fit in the palm of your hand are difficult to resist.Key Lime Linzer CookiesThese are linzer cookies—basically sandwich cookies with little cut-out picture windows to show the filling, which is traditionally jam. Today, I decided to go in another direction with flavors reminiscent of key lime pie. I just love the results—they look so sunny and happy.Key Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer CookiesThe cookie recipe is a spin on my favorite roll-out sugar cookies, although you might not be able to tell from the list of ingredients. I nixed the cream cheese, upped the brown sugar, added pinches of cinnamon and ginger, and swapped a bunch of the flour for graham cracker crumbs.Key Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer CookiesYou’ll notice one glaring omission in these linzers: I left out the traditional nuts. While most recipes have almonds or pecans (or hazelnuts) blitzed into the dough, I found the addition of graham cracker crumbs to be more than adequate. The result is a crisp cut-out cookie with a hint of graham and spice—the perfect compliment to the key lime filling.Key Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer CookiesSpeaking of filling, you’re going to want to put this stuff on everything. Toast, vanilla wafers, ice cream, swirled into yogurt, eaten off a spoon, and probably five other things I haven’t thought of yet. It’s basically key lime pie filling that’s cooked over a double boiler and then allowed to chill until rich, thick, tangy and delicious. It has the texture of a citrus curd, but is half the work and requires only three ingredients! Yesssss. The filling recipe makes a bit more than you’ll need for these cookies, so you’ll have plenty leftover to use elsewhere. Trust me, you’ll be glad to have this stuff around.Key Lime Linzer CookiesWhile it’s good in all sorts of applications, this creamy, dreamy key lime filling is especially good sandwiched between two thin cookies and topped off with a dusting of confectioner’s sugar. I think most things are.Key Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer Cookies

Key Lime Linzer Cookies
makes about 2.5 dozen cookies

Key Lime Filling:
2/3 cup key lime juice (fresh or bottled)
1 14 ounce can sweetened condensed milk
2 large egg yolks, room temperature

Cookie Dough:
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1 cup graham cracker crumbs
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 large egg, room temperature
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For Assembly:
2-3 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar

Special Equipment:
rolling pin
graduated cookie cutters
sifter or wire mesh colander

Make the filling. Fill a small pot with 1-2 inches of water. Set a heatproof bowl over the top, ensuring that the water does not touch the bottom of the bowl. Remove bowl and bring water to a simmer.

In the heatproof bowl, whisk together key lime juice, sweetened condensed milk, and egg yolks. Place bowl over simmering water, creating a double boiler. Let cook, stirring frequently, until slightly thickened (about 15 minutes). Remove from heat and transfer filling to a heatproof container. Press a piece of plastic wrap to the surface. Let cool completely at room temperature. Refrigerate until you are assembling cookies. This may be done up to 2 days in advance.

Make the cookie dough. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, graham cracker crumbs, cinnamon, ginger, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.

In a separate large mixing bowl, use an electric mixer to beat butter until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Cream in granulated and light brown sugars, followed by the egg and vanilla. Add dry ingredients in 3 installments, combining completely after each. Divide dough into 4 parts.

Working with one quarter at a time, sandwich dough between two pieces of parchment paper and roll until 1/4-inch thick. Transfer to the freezer (on a baking sheet, if desired) for 15 minutes. Repeat with remaining dough. It is okay to stack the sheets of dough in the freezer.

While the dough is freezing, preheat the oven to 350F. Line two baking sheets with parchment. Set aside.

Remove one sheet of dough from the freezer. Peel on of the pieces of parchment off. Use a lightly floured 2 1/2-inch round cookie cutter to cut cookies. Use a smaller cookie cutter to punch the centers out of half the cookies. Place them at least 2 inches apart on prepared pans. Repeat with remaining dough. Scraps can be re-rolled, frozen, and cut.

Bake cookies 7-8 minutes, until turning pale golden. Let cookies cool on the pans for five minutes before removing to a rack to cool completely. Repeat rolling, cutting, and baking with any remaining dough.

Set a cooling rack over a piece of parchment. Once all cookies are baked and cooled, set the cookies with the centers cut out on a prepared rack. Sift confectioners sugar over the tops.

Spread each whole cookie with 1 teaspoon of filling (amount is based on your preference). Carefully sandwich cookies together. Serve.

Key Lime Linzer Cookies will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for several days. Place wax paper between layers for best storage.Key Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer CookiesKey Lime Linzer Cookies

Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote

Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteMother’s Day is this weekend and while I won’t be spending the holiday with my mom, I still have “mom food” on the brain. In the case of my mom, that means vanilla and/or fruit, and also things that are both easy and fancy. This Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote absolutely fits that bill.Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompotePanna cotta (Italian for “cooked cream”) is a soft-set cream-based pudding commonly served with fresh berries or a berry sauce. Most are made with a combination of heavy cream and whole milk, but the version I’m serving up today has a pleasant tang, thanks to the addition of buttermilk. It has the creaminess you expect in a custard, but where custards are set with eggs, panna cotta relies on gelatin.Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteI’ve considered panna cotta a “restaurant only” food for years, thinking it was too fancy or time consuming to make at home, or that it required a skill set I didn’t have…Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote…and it’s turned out to be exactly as difficult and time-consuming as making Jell-o. But softer and creamier and with a silky smooth texture.What I’m trying to say is that panna cotta is the ultimate high brow/low brow dessert.Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteMy Buttermilk Panna Cotta has five ingredients and takes all of five minutes of effort (seven, if you count the time for measuring). The time consuming part is waiting for it to set up—this can take anywhere from two to four hours, depending on whether you’re serving it in the mold or inverting it onto a plate. Gelatin gets stronger over time, so if you want to serve free-standing panna cottas, make sure to plan ahead. Otherwise, you can just serve them straight from their molds.Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteAnd speaking of molds, you can find all different kinds online, but I spent $10 on a dozen 4-ounce mason jars last week and, even if I break every last one tomorrow, I already feel like I have gotten my money’s worth. They’re a perfect combination of form and function, and I love the way they showcase these layers of Buttermilk Panna Cotta and Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote.Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteAfter all that talk about panna cotta, I bet this compote seems like an afterthought, but I assure you it. is. not. In fact, this sauce is what really makes this dessert sing!Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote

Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteButtermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteThe sweet-tart combination of strawberries and rhubarb is a classic for a reason. Here, it’s amped up with just a touch of sugar and some lime zest before being tossed with olive oil and roasted until saucy. This takes minimal time and effort and makes much more than you’ll need for six panna cottas. I suggest spooning the leftovers over ice cream or plain yogurt, or just eating them directly from the jar…not that I’d know anything about that.Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteHappy Mother’s Day to everyone celebrating, especially my mom. Thanks for loving me so hard.Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote

Buttermilk Panna Cotta
makes six 4-ounce servings

1 cup heavy cream, divided
1 1/4-ounce packet unflavored gelatin (2 1/4 teaspoons)
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 2/3 cups buttermilk (low fat is fine)

For Serving:
Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote (recipe below)

Gelatin is an animal byproduct. Buttermilk Panna Cotta is not a vegetarian dessert.

Pour 1/2 cup heavy cream into a small saucepan. Sprinkle gelatin granules over the top. Let sit 5-10 minutes, or until gelatin starts to become saturated and surface in wrinkled.

Lightly grease 6 4-ounce molds (I like mason jars) with oil. Set aside.

Pour remaining 1/2 cup heavy cream and sugar into the saucepan. Place pan over low heat. Whisk constantly for 3-5 minutes, or until sugar and gelatin have completely dissolved. Do not let boil. Remove from heat. Add vanilla and buttermilk and whisk for 1 minute, or until fully combined.

Divide mixture among greased molds. Cover with plastic wrap. Chill at least 4 hours (or overnight) if you wish to release the panna cottas from their molds. If being served directly from the molds, they only need a 2 hour chill.

Release the panna cottas from their molds. Fill a deep container with a couple of inches of hot water. Place an in-mold panna cotta in the water for 1 minute.

Swipe a damp paper towel over the plate you wish to use for serving the panna cotta. This will make it easy to move the panna cotta for more aesthetically-pleasing plating.

Remove in-mold panna cotta from the hot water. Run a thin, flexible knife around the edge to break the suction seal. Invert panna cotta onto prepared plate. Tap/jostle mold as necessary to release panna cotta. Repeat process with remaining panna cottas.

Top with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote. Serve immediately.

Panna cottas (still in their molds and without topping) will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. After that point, they may become rubbery.

Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote
makes about 3 cups

1 pound fresh strawberries
1 pound fresh rhubarb, poisonous leaves removed
4 tablespoons granulated sugar
pinch of Kosher or sea salt (optional)
2 teaspoons lime zest
1 tablespoon olive oil

Preheat oven to 375F. Line a rimmed sheet pan (or jelly roll pan) with parchment.

Trim, hull, and dice strawberries into 3/4-inch pieces. Cut rhubarb into 3/4-inch pieces. Place on prepared pan and top with sugar, optional salt, lime zest, and olive oil. Toss together with clean hands.

Bake mixture for 30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes. Compote is ready when strawberries and rhubarb are soft and juices have thickened slightly (they will still be on the thin side).

Let cool before using. Store compote in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Roasted Strawberry Rhubarb CompoteRoasted Strawberry Rhubarb Compote

Strawberry Rhubarb Galette

Strawberry Rhubarb GaletteMy mother is not a baker. If the main ingredients in a recipe are flour, sugar, and butter, she’ll pass or politely ask someone else to make it. That’s why I found it so funny when Shari’s Berries asked me to pass along this Mother’s Day post featuring baking advice from the mothers of popular food bloggers, including Sally of Sally’s Baking Addiction and Michelle from Brown Eyed Baker. Their mothers impart some great advice–my favorite is “Don’t be afraid to mess up!” from Yossi Arefi’s mom. That’s great advice for life in general.

Strawberry Rhubarb GaletteWhen I first got into baking, my mom was left scratching her head. She’s a great cook, but baking just frustrates her. How I grew up to be a baker, I don’t know. It’s probably some sort of cosmic middle child joke.

I have seen my mother bake exactly one thing: a classic cherry-pineapple dump cake. Except that my mother, ever a lady, would never serve something called “dump cake.” Instead she takes a tip from her mother, tops it with vanilla ice cream, and calls it “Simply Delicious.” That’s what it is, after all. I guess my mom’s lone piece of baking advice–besides “don’t”–would be that if you don’t like the name of your dessert, change it.

Strawberry Rhubarb GaletteStrawberry Rhubarb GaletteStrawberry Rhubarb GaletteNo, my mother is not a baker. But when all is said and done, my mom and I, we’re not so different. For one, we’re both caretakers by nature. We express love in acts of service which, incidentally, is also the form in which we receive love. If you mention to my mom that you are struggling with something, she’ll be right there with you, trying to figure it out. If she perceives that you are overwhelmed, she’ll send you flowers or a goofy card. That doesn’t mean she doesn’t occasionally neglect her own needs and make herself crazy because she’s trying to help someone else–that’s something that her mother did before she did and a habit of mine as well. 

Just know that if my mom does you a favor or sends you a gift or calls at 11pm on a Wednesday just because she wants to say hello, it’s because she really values you. And if I make you a pie and put it on the internet for a holiday we can’t even celebrate together, know that it’s because I really value you.

Strawberry Rhubarb GaletteStrawberry Rhubarb GaletteStrawberry Rhubarb GaletteStrawberry Rhubarb GaletteAnother way my mother and I are alike? We both prefer fruit desserts over chocolate.* When I started planning what I’d make for my Mother’s Day post, I really thought about what my mom would like to eat. Strawberry rhubarb pie quickly came to mind, with a whole wheat crust, because my mom will take extra nutrition anywhere she can get it, even in dessert.

*Know that my little sister is rolling her eyes as she reads this.

Strawberry Rhubarb GaletteInstead of making pie, something that my mom would literally never attempt, I went for a simple, rustic Strawberry Rhubarb Galette. Free-form pies are definitely my mom’s style. There’s no crimping or anything–just lay the rolled dough on a baking sheet, pile the filling in the middle, and gather it all together with your hands. Bake it for 45 minutes and let it cool before serving.

My mom, a self-proclaimed vanilla person, would insist on a scoop of vanilla ice cream to go with her slice of this sweet-tart classic dessert. I would too. My mom and I–we’re more alike than we are different.Strawberry Rhubarb GaletteStrawberry Rhubarb Galette

Happy Mother’s Day, Mom! I love you waaaaay more than chocolate. XOXO

Strawberry Rhubarb Galette
makes 1 galette, 8 servings

2 cups fresh strawberries, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 16 ounces)
1 cup fresh rhubarb, trimmed, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 1-2 stalks)
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
pinch of Kosher or sea salt
4 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (about 1 lime)
1/2 recipe Whole Wheat Pie Dough, or other good crust
milk, for brushing
1 tablespoon coarse sugar, for sprinkling (I used turbinado)
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
vanilla ice cream, for serving, if desired

Arrange oven racks in the upper and lower positions. Preheat oven to 375F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Set aside.

Combine strawberries and rhubarb in a large mixing bowl. Add sugar, ginger, nutmeg, salt, cornstarch, and lime juice. Stir together with a silicone spatula or wooden spoon and let sit for 15 minutes at room temperature.

Flour a surface and a rolling pin. Roll pie dough out until it is 1/8-inch thick. Trim scraggly edges, if desired. Transfer to prepared pan. Use a slotted spoon to remove strawberry rhubarb filling from the bowl, leaving behind excess liquid. Mound filling in the middle of the dough, leaving at least 2 inches of excess on all sides. Fold dough over the sides of the filling, to contain it. Brush exposed crust with milk and sprinkle with coarse sugar. Dot exposed filling with butter.

Bake galette on the upper rack for 25 minutes. Tent galette with aluminum foil and move to the lower rack. Bake for 20-25 more minutes. Crust will firm up as the galette cools.

Let galette cool completely in the pan on a rack. Remove to a cutting board. Slice and serve with vanilla ice cream, if desired.

Pie will keep covered at room temperature for three days, or in the refrigerator for up to four.

Strawberry Rhubarb Galette